coated tongue


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tongue

 [tung]
a muscular organ on the floor of the mouth; it aids in chewing, swallowing, and speech, and is the location of organs of taste. The taste buds are located in the papillae, which are projections on the upper surface of the tongue. The condition of the tongue can sometimes be a guide to the general condition of the body. glossitis (inflammation of the tongue) can accompany anemia, scarlet fever, nutritional deficiencies, and most general infections. Sometimes it is part of an adverse reaction to medication. One form of glossitis causes a smooth tongue, with a red, glazed appearance. A coated or furry tongue may be present in a variety of illnesses, but does not necessarily indicate illness. A dry tongue sometimes indicates insufficiency of fluids in the body, or it may result from fever. When the tongue is extremely dry and has a leathery appearance, the cause may be uremia.
The tongue, showing principal structures. From Dorland's, 2000.
bifid tongue a tongue with a lengthwise cleft.
black tongue (black hairy tongue) hairy tongue in which the hypertrophied filiform papillae are brown or black; called also lingua nigra, melanoglossia, and nigrities linguae.
cleft tongue bifid tongue.
coated tongue one covered with a white or yellow layer of desquamated epithelium, debris, bacteria, fungi, or other material.
fissured tongue (furrowed tongue) a tongue with numerous furrows or grooves on the dorsal surface, often radiating from a groove on the midline.
geographic tongue a tongue with denuded patches, surrounded by thickened epithelium.
hairy tongue a benign condition of the tongue characterized by hypertrophy of the filiform papillae that gives the dorsum of the tongue a furry appearance. The color of the elongated papillae varies from yellowish white to brown or black, depending upon staining by substances such as tobacco, foods, or drugs.
raspberry tongue a diffusely reddened and swollen, uncoated tongue, as seen several days after the onset of the rash in scarlet fever.
scrotal tongue fissured tongue.
strawberry tongue, red raspberry t.
strawberry tongue, white the white-coated tongue with prominent red papillae characteristic of the early stage of scarlet fever; the coating desquamates, leaving a beefy red (raspberry) tongue.

coat·ed tongue

a tongue with a whitish layer on its upper surface, composed of epithelial debris, food particles, and bacteria; often an indication of indigestion or of fever.
Synonym(s): furred tongue
A term of art referring to three different conditions:
(1) Oral candidiasis, see there
(2) Strawberry tongue, see there
(3) A popular term for a film of bacteria and debris covering the tongue in absence of clinical disease

coated tongue

1. Oral candidiasis, see there.
2. Strawberry tongue, see there.
3. A popular term for a film of bacteria and debris covering the tongue in absence of clinical disease.

coat·ed tongue

(kōt'ĕd tŭng)
A tongue with a whitish layer on its upper surface, composed of epithelial debris, food particles, and bacteria; often seen in fever or fasting.

coat·ed tongue

(kōt'ĕd tŭng)
Tongue with a whitish layer on its upper surface, composed of epithelial debris, food particles, and bacteria; often an indication of indigestion or of fever.
Synonym(s): furred tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The alterations most commonly identified in this study were melanotic maculae, linea alba, traumatic ulcers, Fordyce's granules, coated tongue and fissured tongue.
On the other hand, the high prevalence of coated tongue may be related to the socioeconomic deprivation in the region and traumatic ulcers may be associated with the traumatic agents that caused patients to seek dental care.
Fever with toxic look, anorexia, vomiting, coated tongue, hepatosplenomegaly are the common features of children with typhoid disease in this study.
Table 1 Symptoms N=26 (%) Signs N-26 (%) Fever 26 (100) Toxic look 20 (76.9) Anorexia 17 (65.4) Coated tongue 19 (73.1) Vomiting 17 (65.4) Hepatomegaly 16 (61.5) Chills 16 (61.5) Splenomegaly 12 (46.2) Cough 15 (57.7) Hepatosplenomegaly 10 (38.1) Abdominal pain 12 (46.2) Lymphadenopathy 7 (26.9) Headache 11 (42.3) Pallor 5 (38.4) Diarrhoea 9 (34.6) Abdominal pain 3 (11.5) Constipation 1 (3.8) ALOC 1 (3.8) Epistaxis 1 (3.8) Table 2.
The most prevalent oral mucosal alterations not related to the wearing of a removable prostheses were sublingual varicosities and a coated tongue.
(20) A considerable prevalence of coated tongues was observed and may be related to inadequate oral hygiene or represent the side effect of medications that are regularly ingested by this age group.
of Cases Percentage Fever 98 100 Headache 78 76.53 Vomiting 26 26.53 Anorexia 80 81.63 Abdominal pain and 68 69.38 Distension Diarrhea 37 37.75 Constipation 28 28.57 Cough 26 26.53 Signs Hepatomegaly 76 77.55 Splenomegaly 38 38.77 Coated tongue 80 81.63 Rose spot 0 0
Coated tongue (Fig 2) was seen in 9% males and 8% females.
Quite similarly, Malekmakan and his colleagues from Iran in 2011 reported altered taste in 49% of patients in their study.13 Concurrently, a study from India reported the prevalence of altered taste sensation in 42% CKD patients.15 Belazelkovska et al in 2013 however reported dysguesia in 33% patients while quite lower frequency of 3% was reported from india.16 Coated tongue was seen in 17% patients in current study.
Physical examination revealed hepatomegaly 53.1%, splenomegaly 24.3%, anemia 24.6%, jaundice 10.4%, lymphadenopathy 8.9% and coated tongue 6.5% as prominent clinical findings.
But coughs, coated tongues, and swollen lymph glands didn't.