redwood

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redwood

see SEQUOIA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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"The PORTS redwood ecology program has been extremely successful at generating student enthusiasm about coast redwoods. We expect a similar result from the giant sequoia study unit.
The oldest known coast redwood south of Mendocino County and the largest diameter (widest) coast redwood south of Humboldt County has been discovered on the property; it is estimated to be 1,640 years old with a trunk diameter of 19 feet (as wide as a two-lane street).
Show, "Timber Growing Practice in the Coast Redwood Region of California," Technical Bulletin 283, March 1932, in USDA Technical Bulletins No.
Here he reviewed several genera and reclassified several, including Taxodinm sempervirens, the extant genus of the Coast Redwood of California.
The results came in almost simultaneously, but controversy exploded over whether the issue was "big by volume" or "big by height." One phone diverted our attention to the Hyperion coast redwood, the tallest living tree at 379 feet tall--taller than a football field is long.
Let us live in planet like brotherhood, standing tall like coast redwood.
Coast redwood is a California Floristic Province endemic, currently restricted to the coastal belt from central California to southern Oregon.
But both have some way to go to match the tallest tree in the world: a Coast Redwood in north California called Hyperion which is 115.55m tall.
Vavona burl, vavona burr, redwood burl, redwood, coast redwood, sequoia, California redwood
360 feet height of the world's tallest tree, a Coast Redwood in California
Water is just as precious to the coast redwood as it is to Sillett.
* Coast Redwood: A Natural and Cultural History, by Michael Barbour, Sandy Lydon, Mark Borchert, Marjorie Popper, Valerie Whitworth, and John Evarts (Cachuma Press, $27.95), not only showcases the trees, but in more than 200 color photos reveals the immense diversity of plants and animals of the forest.