coalesce

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coalesce

(kō-ăl-ĕs′) [L. coalescere]
To fuse; to run or grow together.
References in periodicals archive ?
The best coalescing filters will have a pleated media, a high flow rate and low pressure drop.
Figure 3 shows the case where (a) a coalescing aid (in black) is highly water soluble and, therefore, quite ineffective due to decreased interaction with hydrophobic latex species, (b) a coalescing aid is very latex soluble but has very low water solubility, and (c) where the coalescing aid is surfactant miscible and stable at the boundaries of the latex particles.
And this method determines how many coalescing aids should be added to the latex formula to get a uniform film under given conditions.
The polymer interface appeared between two coalescing bubbles.
Atkins further states that there have been "...no air problems since day one; no cavitation or anything." This is attributed to the coalescing medium, which breaks up the air and water mixture and allows the air to travel up through the vessel's turbulence suppressive static column to the air chamber and integral venting mechanism.
The most revealing finding was that there are ways of coalescing progressives that don't necessitate organizing around issues or electoral preferences, which only aggravate differences among groups.
In the most popular theory, planets were spawned by bits of material in the disks gradually coalescing into larger and larger objects.
Colorless and hydrolytically stable, EEH solvent is used as a highly efficient coalescing aid to enhance the performance of a wide range of latex polymers, providing enhanced wetting, flow and leveling properties to coatings, according to the company.
The other dancers appear and disappear randomly, sometimes coalescing into richly designed units.
If a planetary-mass object formed as a star does, rather than coalescing within a disk, then the object shouldn't be called a planet, according to the International Astronomical Union.
Bach's third Brandenburg Concerto and sections from the second, first, and sixth concerti, the new ballet opens with eight couples, in diamond formation, bobbing in plie before trios peel away, then coalescing into new shapes (circles, squares, diagonals).
Somewhere in the universe, in the dim recesses of a vast cloud of gas and dust, wisps of material are slowly coalescing onto a clump that has been growing for hundreds of thousands of years.