coalesce


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coalesce

(kō-ăl-ĕs′) [L. coalescere]
To fuse; to run or grow together.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the company, COALESCE features its novel proprietary porous PEEK biomaterial and is the second porous PEEK device to receive US FDA clearance behind its COHERE Cervical Interbody Fusion Device.
Often such firms bring executives together to coalesce a strategy for introducing new drugs.
These data have revealed a previously unrecognized phase at temperatures above 40 [degrees]C in which the bilayer fragments coalesce to form extended single-bilayer sheets.
Comprised of nine pamphlets, this new series is important for two reasons: (1) it represents a joint effort by two major Baptist historical societies to coalesce around common ideals; and (2) it symbolizes an urgent desire to communicate to the Baptist public historical information that informs what it means to be creatively Baptist in today's world.
We suggest that the ideal soil structure consists of a loose packing of soft, porous aggregates that are high in organic matter, very stable, and which do not coalesce; these properties are typified by virgin soils.
Every week this hosts Coalesce, a bunker-like blur of smoke, strobes and hippy trippy toons that smack of summer of love raves gone by.
That's where Christian ethics and politics coalesce.'
Members may try to coalesce behind a single GOP presidential candidate to ensure that the party's nod in 2000 goes to someone who will advance the Religious Right agenda.
From the research, we can see, for example, that in Cincinnati the residential separation between dark-skinned blacks and light-skinned mulattoes was as great as between blacks and whites in Brooklyn; yet on crucial issues black urbanites could coalesce in Northern cities such as Cincinnati.
This is followied by a brief outburst of violence; eventually the remaining Canadian provinces coalesce into regional groupings whose economic ties to the United States are stronger than their political ties to Ottawa.
Part One, Introduction, provides an overview of allied health education, and cites present and future challenges including: the potential to coalesce the many disciplines into a more unified allied health movement, to provide a data base regarding supply and demand, to acknowledge the impact of women in our changing society, an awareness of escalation of qualifications for practice, and increasing demands for allied health research.