coalcoholism

co·al·co·hol·ism

(kō-al'kŏ-hol-izm'),
The constellation of attitudes, attributes, and behaviors of the person who enables the alcoholic that are necessary for the attainment of a symbiotic balance between alcoholic and coalcoholic.
See also: symbiosis.

co·al·co·hol·ism

(kō-al'kŏ-hol-izm)
The constellation of attitudes, attributes, and behaviors of the person who enables the alcoholic, which are necessary for the attainment of a symbiotic balance between alcoholic and coalcoholic.
See also: symbiosis
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to examining alcoholism in, say, Sons and Lovers, we need to consider more fully all the implications of coalcoholism, the presence of related dependencies in the family system.
The solutions Helen eventually adopts are those emphasized in the treatment of "coalcoholism": disregarding the alcoholic's promises, lessening dependence on the opinions of others, and learning to set boundaries, to express feelings, and to live in the present moment.
The term "coalcoholism," denoting that a family member (initially the wife) of an alcoholic was herself suffering from a disease that needed treatment, first arose among alcohol treatment professionals in the early 1970s, providing a justification for treatment of the alcoholic's family member in the absence of the alcoholic.