coagulation necrosis


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Related to coagulation necrosis: coagulative, liquefaction necrosis, Necrotic tissue

necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

co·ag·u·la·tion ne·cro·sis

a type of necrosis in which the affected cells or tissue are converted into a dry, dull, fairly homogeneous eosinophilic mass without nuclear staining, as a result of the coagulation of protein as occurs in an infarct; microscopically, the necrotic process involves chiefly the cells, and remnants of histologic elements (for example, elastin, collagen, muscle fibers) may be recognizable, as well as "ghosts" of cells and portions of cell membranes; may be caused by heat, ischemia, and other agents that destroy tissue, including enzymes that would continue to alter the devitalized cellular substance.

coagulation necrosis

A type of necrosis caused by denaturation of intracellular proteins in response to severe injury—e.g., hypoxia, infection, ischaemia, toxins and trauma.

co·ag·u·la·tion ne·cro·sis

(kō-ag'yū-lā'shŭn nĕ-krō'sis)
A type of cell death in which the affected cells or tissue are converted into a dry, dull, homogeneous eosinophilic mass without nuclei, as a result of the coagulation of protein as occurs in an infarct.
References in periodicals archive ?
The specific aspect of coagulation necrosis was found in the epidermis, the superficial papillary dermis, and the whole deep reticular dermis (Figure 4(h)).
The presence of coagulation necrosis in the epidermis, superficial papillary dermis, and the deep reticular dermis was associated with the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate with both acute and chronic phase cells.
We reported an invasive pulmonary mucormycosis case involving RHS, which showed coagulation necrosis of the alveolar septa and remaining air content in the central area with mirrored central ground-glass opacity.
The ablation was designed to induce coagulation necrosis of the surrounding tissue in a radial of 1 cm beyond its borders.
There was coagulation necrosis in several foci.The neoplasm was composed of spindle cells without a definite organoid pattern.
For jejunal and ileal tumours, a diametre Greater than 5 cm, Greater than 5 mitoses per 50 high-power fields and the presence of coagulation necrosis are poor prognostic factors.
A maximal intratumoral temperature should be >60[degrees]C to ensure that adequate coagulation necrosis has occurred.
Radiofrequency ablation: Effect of surrounding tissue composition on coagulation necrosis in a canine tumor model.
Epithelium is stripped off, squamous epithelial cells are distorted, and excessive carbonization and coagulation necrosis make specimens uninterpretable.
Nevertheless, her pulmonary ventilation and perfusion scanning [Figure 1]a and [Figure 1]b showed a defect in lower lobe of the left lung, which did not match the pulmonary ventilation imaging, led to the diagnosis of "pulmonary embolism." Her renal biopsy showed: 3/17 glomerular sclerosis, 7/17 coagulation necrosis, a portion of tubular epithelial necrosis, bare basement membrane formation, a large number of cellular pipe, particle of tube formation; a large number of lymph plasma cells and eosinophil granulocyte infiltration in interstitium, arteriolar wall thickening, and hyaline degeneration.
(10) In SMD, an area of coagulation necrosis is formed along the electrode passage, which is replaced with sclerotic connective tissue providing a stable reduction of the enlarged turbinate.
Similar to the electrocoagulation, HIFU results in tissue coagulation necrosis, which can potentially lead to local tissue weakness.