coach

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coach

(kōch)
To provide suggestions, feedback, direction, training, and redirection to another person or to a group or team to improve the ability to perform a task well.
2. One who provides such suggestions, feedback, direction, or training.

health coach

One who educates, encourages, and motivates another to achieve improved fitness or wellness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Athletes with a decent skill set, decent talent, and a coachable attitude; is in a better position than the athlete who is very skilled and very talented but does not have a coachable attitude.
He has that drive and desire to be coachable. And that's a huge thing - to be coachable and not only get the stats, the assists and the goals but to do what the coach asks is not an easy thing to do.
These behavioral bridges include: communicates clear strategy and direction, inspires and motivates, establishes stretch goals, has integrity and inspires trust, develops others, and is coachable.
also understanding the game and just being coachable. I've come a long way in that category of being coachable.
Are you coachable? If not, your alien encounter might not go so well.
The life skills that these youngsters are taking away with them is so important to us, a coachable athlete leads to an employable adult and these children have risen to every challenge we have set them all season.
"If you are not coachable and willing to sacrifice then you will not get anywhere.
"Phil (Hill) is a top-level British player, reliable, coachable, capable of scoring big goals," says Adams.
4 Be humble and coachable. The greatest hindrance to progress is pride.
Another freshman, Joseph is very coachable, and a well-rounded athlete with good shooting ability to go with solid ball-handling skills.
"If you have guys with a reasonable level of talent and are coachable, then you can get those guys to where they need to be as they are willing to listen.
In addition, the SAT is highly coachable, with wealthier families having access to more and better coaching, which exacerbates the inequalities that are already there," he says.