clue cell


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Related to clue cell: parabasal cell

clue cell

a type of vaginal epithelial cell that appears granular and is coated with coccobacillary organisms; seen in bacterial vaginosis.
A superficial squamous cell with peripheral clumps of gram-negative Gardnerella vaginalis, which imparts a stippled, granular appearance on a ‘wet mount’ of a cervical smear
Treatment Metronidazole

clue cell

(klū sel)
A type of vaginal epithelial cell that appears granular and is coated with coccobacillary organisms; seen in bacterial vaginosis.

clue cell

A vaginal epithelial cell, thickly coated with coccobacillary organisms. Clue cells are a hallmark of bacterial vaginosis.
See also: cell
References in periodicals archive ?
124 71 195 Pearson Chi-Square % 87.3% 15.5% 32.5% Continuity Correction Clue Cells No.
Confirming a diagnosis of BV is based on the presence of at least three of four characteristics as established by Amsel: 1) grayish-white discharge; 2) positive "whiff' test (a drop of 10% KOH + a sample of vaginal fluid generates a strong fish-like odor); 3) pH is greater than 4.5; and 4) presence of clue cells. (2,6) Presence of clue cells found in a wet mount preparation of vaginal secretions is a strong indication for BV.
TABLE 1 Predictive values of Amsel's criteria (using 3 of 4 positive as diagnostic reference standard) Diagnostic criterion Predictive value (%) Positive Negative Homogeneous 42 89 thin discharge seen at introitus pH >4.5 53 94 Odor on 94 93 alkalinization Clue cells on 90 99 wet mount Source: Thomason et al 1990.
Vaginal pH >4.5 had the highest sensitivity, while highest specificity was observed for 'clue cells'.
Clue cells were identified and demonstrated in 39 women in the study group and in the control group only in 15 women.
Bacterial vaginosis was defined as the presence of clue cells in a vaginal specimen and at least two of the following findings: a vaginal discharge, vaginal specimen pH greater than 4.5, or a positive amine test following the addition of 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) to the specimen.[12] Bacterial vaginosis was also defined as a positive DNA probe test result for G vaginalis (Affirm VPIII, Microprobe, Bothell, Wash) and a pH greater than 4.5.[19] The exclusion criterion was a history of hypersensitivity to metronidazole, parabens, propylene glycol, clindamycin, or mineral oil.
Among 147 mothers 40 (27.2%) of the cytology report came out to be positive for clue cells and 107 (72.8%) were negative for clue cells and 29(19.7%) were positive for presence of yeast cells and 118(80.3%) were negative for presence of yeast cells and 40(27.2%) vaginal smears were positive for both clue cells and inflammatory cell.
Sensitivity and Specificity of Various Characteristics for BV Characteristic Sensitivity Specificity Vaginal discharge 0.74 0.52 pH [greater than or equal to] 4.5 0.84 0.80 Positive amine odor 0.71 0.97 Clue cells present (>20%/high-power field) 0.71 0.91 Elevated pH and amine odor 0.67 0.99 Elevated pH and clue cells 0.67 0.96 Clue cells and amine odor 0.64 0.99 Amsel's criteria (at least three of four criteria 0.68 0.98 Source: Dr.
Q Are clue cells significant when observed in a clean catch urine specimen?
A wet mount was examined by bright field microscopy at x 400 magnification for the presence of T vaginalis and clue cells (vaginal epithelial cells studded with coccobacilli).