clothing

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clothing

[AS. clath, cloth]
Wearing apparel; used both functionally and decoratively. From the medical standpoint, clothes conserve heat or protect the body (e.g., gloves, sunhelmets, and shoes). Air spaces in a fabric and its texture, rather than the material alone, conserve heat. In matted woolen fabrics, the air spaces are destroyed and insulation is lost. Wool and silk absorb more moisture than other fabrics, but silk loses it more readily. Cotton and linen come next, but linen loses moisture more quickly than cotton. Knitted fabrics absorb and dry more readily than woven fabrics of the same material. The temperature inside an individual's hat may vary from 13° to 20°F (7° to 11°C) warmer than the outside temperature.

adapted clothing

Garments designed with special features, such as Velcro closures, to enable persons with disabilities to dress themselves without assistance.
See: clo; hypothermia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in classic literature ?
He showed me the clothing, which I resolutely put on; the letters, which I put into my pocket.
Having been so long without proper food, a bath, and a change of clothing, I did not, of course, make a very favourable impression upon her, and I could see at once that there were doubts in her mind about the wisdom of admitting me as a student.
The sun was fast drying their clothing, and Tip stirred up his Majesty's straw so that the warm rays might absorb the moisture and make it as crisp and dry as ever.
The body was entirely naked, the clothing being strewn about the corpse.
It was Achmet Zek, and he cursed because he had discovered beneath the blankets of his lieutenant only a pile of discarded clothing arranged in the form and semblance of a sleeping man--Albert Werper had fled.
His clothing was in disorder, his hair fell across his forehead in a derangement which was at once uncanny and picturesque.
'Then they tore off her dainty clothing, and cut her beautiful body into pieces and sprinkled salt upon it.'
The discarded clothing of the Prince he wrapped about a huge stone torn from the disintegrating masonry of the river wall, and consigned the bundle to the voiceless river.
The necessaries of life for man in this climate may, accurately enough, be distributed under the several heads of Food, Shelter, Clothing, and Fuel; for not till we have secured these are we prepared to entertain the true problems of life with freedom and a prospect of success.