'clot-busting' drugs

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'clot-busting' drugs

antiplatelet agents (e.g. aspirin, clopidogrel) preventing platelet aggregation, and fibrinolytic agents (e.g. streptodornase and streptokinase) that degrade fibrin; used to disperse intravascular clots (see warfarin sodium)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Average time from the first call for help to receiving clot-busting drugs was 56 minutes compared to 94 minutes.
3) promoting admission to Stroke Units ; 4) highlighting conditions for best-practice treatments such as clot-busting drugs, and mechanical clot retrieval ; 5) acknowledging that rehabilitation is a critical step in the treatment process; 6) highlighting secondary prevention treatments and lifestyle changes; and, 7) to encourage everyone to take action to drive awareness and push for better access to stroke treatments.
MR CLEAN, along with four other studies from Canada, the United States, Europe and Australia, account for a significant amount of high-quality evidence demonstrating improved outcomes for patients receiving endovascular therapy with stent retrievers in addition to clot-busting drugs (lytics).
When a patient arrives at the Emergency Room with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), doctors must quickly decide whether the patient should be treated with clot-busting drugs, or with invasive surgery.
A high-tech stroke ambulance is delivering clot-busting drugs faster than ever before and improving quality of life for stroke survivors.
Matty, who works at Xercise4Less in his home town of Stockton, was given clot-busting drugs at hospital but these did not improve his condition.
Doctors at Western General Hospital and the University of Edinburgh said compression socks did not improve survival and clot-busting drugs led to other problems, including bleeding on the brain.
Every year 150,000 people in the UK have a stroke and if they receive clot-busting drugs within the first few hours their chances of a full recovery are much greater.
The study looked at the effect of treating ischemic stroke victims with clot-busting drugs.
When clot-busting drugs cannot be used or are ineffective, the clot can sometimes be mechanically removed during, or past, the four-and-a-half-hour window.
But in the first month, the centralised stroke unit gave clot-busting drugs to 24% of stroke victims.
From the moment people suffer a stroke, medics only have a four-and-ahalf-hour window to treat them with clot-busting drugs.