closed skill

closed skill

(klōzd skil)
One of a series of movement patterns performed in a predictable, nonchanging environment so that movements can be planned in advance (e.g., keyboarding).
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Namely, most of the research has focused either on specific types of sports, that is, open skill sport (such as karate, in which the participants fight in an environment that is changing rapidly) versus closed skill sport (such as gymnastics, in which the athletes perform in a relatively static environment) [23, 24], or on the level of competence of the athletes (i.e., experts versus novices) [25, 26].
Imagery use of athletes in individual and team sports that require open and closed skill. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 114(3), 748-756.
Most previous research addressing the contextual interference (CI) effect in applied sport settings have focused on multiple skills practiced independent of one another (e.g., Farrow and Maschette, 1997; Fialho et al., 2006; Granda Vera et al., 2008; Jones and French, 2007; Zetou et al., 2007) and in a closed skill manner (e.g., Brady, 1997; Landin et al., 2003; Meira and Tani, 2003; Porter and Magill, 2010; Wrisberg and Liu, 1991).
Say what you like about Maggs's selection or tactics, but when a player fails to complete a basic, closed skill and then a colleague compounds the error with a moment of indiscipline - despite being warned ad nauseum about the need to be squeaky clean - any coach in the land would feel impotent.
The way you stick the same ball between the same posts is the same process - it's a closed skill."
You would think that practice makes perfect with a closed skill like hitting the jumpers, but there are times when you think Bennett wouldn't hit his targets if he were there until midnight.
We've been working on kicking as a mental discipline and a closed skill that can be learned," he said.
It's a closed skill that you have to keep separate from how you are playing.
Examples: Golf, bowling, archery, most track and field events, competitive weightlifting, and tee-ball all have the requisites of closed skill sports.
CSP stands for Closed Skill Performance, worked out by calculating Wilkinson's angle of approach to the ball, the speed of his run-up, his foot and ball placement, and kicking leg velocity.
If, however, the acclimatization was found to be durable in basketball under match conditions where the variables are consistent with free throws, there is the possibility that it could also be durable in other sports with identical closed skill tasks and requirements (e.g., soccer penalty kicks, archery).