adjustment disorder

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adjustment

 [ah-just´ment]
the changing of something to improve its relationship to something else.
adjustment disorder a mental disorder characterized by a maladaptive reaction to identifiable stressful life events, such as divorce, loss of job, physical illness, or natural disaster; this diagnosis assumes that the condition will remit when the stress ceases or when the patient adapts to the situation. Called also adjustment reaction.
impaired adjustment a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to modify lifestyle or behavior in a manner consistent with a change in health status.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Adjustment Disorder

A constellation of extreme reactions seen in adolescents, in response to social (and familial) demands to establish personal identity and independence from family.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

adjustment disorder

Child psychiatry A constellation of extreme reactions in adolescents to social demands for establishing personal identity and independence from family
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ad·just·ment dis·order

(ă-jŭst'mĕnt dis-ōr'dĕr)
1. A class of mental and behavioral disorders in which the development of symptoms is related to the presence of some environmental stressor or life event and is expected to remit when the stress ceases.
2. A disorder the essential feature of which is a maladaptive reaction to an identifiable psychological stress, or stressors, which occurs within weeks of the onset of the stressors and persists for up to 6 months.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Adjustment disorder

A disorder defined by the development of significant emotional or behavioral symptoms in response to a stressful event or series of events within the normal range of human experience.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.