curve

(redirected from closed curve)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to closed curve: simple curve

curve

 [kerv]
a line that is not straight, or that describes part of a circle, especially a line representing varying values in a graph.
dose-effect curve (dose-response curve) a graphic representation of the effect caused by an agent (such as a drug or radiation) plotted against the dose, showing the relationship of the effect to changes in the dose.
growth curve the curve obtained by plotting increase in size or numbers against the elapsed time.
oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve a graphic curve representing the normal variation in the amount of oxygen that combines with hemoglobin as a function of the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The curve is said to shift to the right when less than a normal amount of oxygen is taken up by the blood at a given Po2, and to shift to the left when more than a normal amount is taken up. Factors influencing the shape of the curve include changes in the blood pH, Pco2, and temperature; the presence of carbon monoxide; alterations in the constituents of the erythrocytes; and certain disease states.
pulse curve sphygmogram.
Spee curve (curve of Spee) the anatomic curvature of the occlusal alignment of teeth, beginning at the tip of the lower canine, following the buccal cusps of the premolars and molars, and continuing to the anterior border of the ramus.
strength-duration curve a graphic representation of the relationship between the intensity of an electric stimulus at the motor point of a muscle and the length of time it must flow to elicit a minimal contraction; see also chronaxie and rheobase. In cardiac pacing it is useful in determining characteristics of a particular pacing electrode and determining the most efficient selection of pacing parameters for an appropriate safety margin.
survival curve a graph of the probability of survival versus time, commonly used to present the results of clinical trials, e.g., a graph of the fraction of patients surviving (until death, relapse, or some other defined endpoint) at each time after a certain therapeutic procedure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

curve

(kerv),
1. A nonangular continuous bend or line.
2. A chart or graphic representation, by means of a continuous line connecting individual observations, of the course of a physiologic activity, of the number of cases of a disease in a given period, or of any entity that might be otherwise presented by a table of figures. Synonym(s): chart (2)
[L. curvo, to bend]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A nonangular deviation from a straight course in a line or surface
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

curve

(kŭrv)
1. A nonangular continuous bend or line.
2. A chart or graphic representation, by means of a continuous line connecting individual observations of the course of a physiologic activity, of the number of cases of a disease in a given period, or of any entity that might be otherwise presented by a table of figures.
Synonym(s): chart (2) .
[L. curvo, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

curve

(kŭrv)
1. A nonangular continuous bend or line.
2. A chart or graphic representation, by means of a continuous line connecting individual observations, of the course of a physiologic activity, of the number of cases of a disease in a given period, or of any entity that might be otherwise presented by a table of figures.
[L. curvo, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about curve

Q. I broke my pinkie finger a year ago. It is locked in a curved position. How can I straiten it out?

A. i would let a certified orthopedic look at the finger. treatment is according to the severity of the case. i think Terrany method is about finger physiotherapy. i'm not sure this method is to reshape uneven bone healing. this is a bit different situation, bone can be reshaped, this is how an orthodontic can move teeth- by changing the bone. but it takes a few years. i would go to an orthopedic, i advise you to do the same.

More discussions about curve
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let [gamma] be a closed curve in a Riemannian surface, M, with Gaussian curvature K.
The following relation can be used to judge whether the minimum distance of the two closed curves, in which the minimal cut stays, is satisfied:
The Two Invariant Closed Curves. In this subsection, we assume that the nondegeneracy condition of Neimark-Sacker bifurcation does not hold, that is, a(0) = 0, then model (5) will undergo Chenciner bifurcation at the equilibrium point (C, L).
We first observe that if R is not a disk, then the border of R will contain the [alpha]i together with a finite number of simple closed curves that are mapped into A.
Links AB, BC, CD, BP, and CP remain the same to keep the shape of the closed curve traced by P under the three parametrizations.
Uniform B-splines are convenient to represent closed curves. The only thing needed is a change in the number of the curve segments.
Combining the arcs along [gamma] and [phi] between [v.sub.1] and [v.sub.2], we obtain a closed curve with total length at most 2[epsilon]/3, so that the distance between any two points on the curve is at most [epsilon]/3.
Plainly a borderline closed curve of the figure which has the hole surrounds inwardly all figures except the figure itself and figures which its other borderline closed curves surround inwardly respectively; yet the borderline closed curve surrounds outwardly the figure and those figures which the other borderline closed curves surround inwardly respectively, therefore we need merely to prove all figures at a planar map from any spherical map, to wit O.K.
However, since contour always has the form of closed curve, we present curve distance as a better inherent feature for the contour.
The equations are generated by a complex vector field that is elliptic everywhere except along a simple closed curve, explains Meziani (mathematics, Florida International U., Miami).
A closed curve [GAMMA] in [R.sup.2] is an initial position for a front, the level set method takes the perspective of viewing r as the zero level set of a function [phi](x,t = 0), from [R.sup.2] to R.
Now it's true that a parabola is an ellipse with it foci an infinite distance apart, so if we consider the parabola a closed curve at infinity it is a closed curve, but I doubt if many mathematicians would think it topologically equivalent to a closed curve.