wind

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wind

anemophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

wind

pronounced WIN'd Vox populi The rushing of air from one point to another, generally induced by differences in land temperature. See Fire wind.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wind

A popular term for the result of air swallowing by greedy babies. Air swallowed along with a feed becomes compressed by PERISTALSIS and may cause COLIC and much crying. Slower feeding, dill water and silicone polymer oils, to reduce surface tension and form froth, are helpful.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about wind

Q. second wind My cousin is an experienced aerobic for nearly 2 years. She does vigorous exercises. How a ''second wind'' affects her and what is it?

A. The term ‘second wind is mostly known to the people who are related to the fitness. No matter how fit you are, the first few minutes into vigorous exercise you'll feel out of breath, and your muscles may ache. Your body isn't able to transport oxygen to the active muscles quickly enough. As a result, your muscles burn carbohydrates an aerobically, causing an increase in lactic acid production. Gradually, your body makes the transition to aerobic metabolism and begins to burn nutrients (carbohydrates and fats) aerobically. This shift over to aerobic metabolism coincides with your getting ''back in stride'' (a.k.a. the ''second wind''). The more you train and the more fit you become, the sooner you will get your ''breath'' back and reach an aerobic steady state that you can maintain for a relatively extended duration.

More discussions about wind
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References in periodicals archive ?
Parry's barrister Gareth Roberts said the victim was perhaps someone "who sailed close to the wind."
And Mourinho sailed close to the wind in a BBC interview when he said: "Mr Foy knew perfectly what he was doing.
These children do not understand the recession, nor how it was brought about through, in the main, the wheeling and dealing of rich bankers, many of whom were sailing close to the wind and have been over-compensated to the tune of millions when found out and had to resign.
But Mr Huhne said: "The law suggests George Osborne and Andrew Feldman have been sailing close to the wind. The Electoral Commission should launch an inquiry or clarify its interpretation of the law."
That's sailing pretty close to the wind, too close for someone who aspires to national political office.
Bradley's demise made the back page of the Daily Mail and was given a full page of coverage inside, in which racing editor Marcus Townend gave his verdict of Bradley's troubled career under the sub-headline "Arrogant jockey has finally paid for years of sailing close to the wind".
The guys will be sailing pretty close to the wind and there is no doubt it is likely to be the highlight of the evening.
And the presenter sailed close to the wind with a crude gag on playing football on pitches covered with landmines.
The judge added: "You are sailing very close to the wind in terms of speed and holding on to your licence."
Speaking about the big night, due to be filmed on Friday November 13, Whitehall said: "Having been lucky enough to perform for Prince Charles and Prince William in previous years I look forward to the opportunity of sailing a little too close to the wind in the presence of Prince Harry this time round.