clonus


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Related to clonus: ankle clonus

clonus

 [klo´nus]
1. alternate involuntary muscular contraction and relaxation in rapid succession.
2. a continuous rhythmic reflex tremor initiated by the spinal cord below an area of spinal cord injury, set in motion by reflex testing.
ankle clonus (foot clonus) a series of abnormal reflex movements of the foot, induced by sudden dorsiflexion, causing alternate contraction and relaxation of the triceps surae muscle.
toe clonus abnormal rhythmic contraction of the great toe, induced by sudden passive extension of its first phalanx.
wrist clonus spasmodic contraction of the hand muscles, induced by forcibly extending the hand at the wrist.

clo·nus

(klō'nŭs),
A form of movement marked by contractions and relaxations of a muscle, occurring in rapid succession seen with, among other conditions, spasticity and some seizure disorders.
See also: contraction.
[G. klonos, a tumult]

clonus

/clo·nus/ (klo´nus)
1. alternate involuntary muscular contraction and relaxation in rapid succession.
2. a continuous rhythmic reflex tremor initiated by the spinal cord below an area of spinal cord injury, set in motion by reflex testing.clon´ic

ankle clonus , foot clonus a series of abnormal reflex movements of the foot, induced by sudden dorsiflexion, causing alternate contraction and relaxation of the triceps surae muscle.
wrist clonus  spasmodic movement of the hand, induced by forcibly extending the hand at the wrist.

clonus

(klō′nəs)
n. pl. clo·nuses
An abnormality in neuromuscular activity characterized by rapidly alternating muscular contraction and relaxation.

clon′ic (klŏn′ĭk, klō′nĭk) adj.
clo·nic′i·ty (klō-nĭs′ĭ-tē, klŏ-), clo′nism (klō′nĭz′əm, klŏn′ĭz′əm) n.

clonus (C)

[klō′nəs]
Etymology: Gk, klonos, tumult
an abnormal pattern of neuromuscular activity, characterized by rapidly alternating involuntary contraction and relaxation of skeletal muscle. Compare tonus. clonic, adj.

clonus

Neurology
1. A volley of muscle contractions and relaxations, occurring in rapid succession.
2. An abrupt transient muscle contraction.

clo·nus

(klō'nŭs)
A form of movement marked by contractions and relaxations of a muscle, occurring in rapid succession; seen with, among other conditions, spasticity, and some seizure disorders.
See also: contraction
Synonym(s): clonospasm.
[G. klonos, a tumult]

clonus

Repetitive contraction and relaxation of stretched muscles which have been deprived of the smoothing and controlling influence of higher centres in the nervous system, in conditions such as STROKE. A feature of an ‘upper motor neurone lesion’. Clonus is also a feature of GRAND MAL epilepsy.

clonus

involuntary movement diagnostic of an upper motor neurone lesion, marked by rapidly alternating muscle group contraction and relaxation and induced by sudden tendon stretch (e.g. sudden dorsiflexion of foot at the ankle causes clonus foot tremor)

clonus (klōˑ·ns),

n abnormal neuromuscular activity marked by the involuntary relaxation and contractions of the skeletal muscles.

clo·nus

(klō'nŭs)
A form of movement marked by contractions and relaxations of a muscle, occurring in rapid succession seen with, among other conditions, spasticity and some seizure disorders.
[G. klonos, a tumult]

clonus (klō´nəs),

n an alternating muscular spasm and relaxation in rapid succession.

clonus

alternate involuntary muscular contraction and relaxation in rapid succession. A sign of upper motor neuron disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of the categorical data between regular orthosis users and non-users Patients with Patients who regular terminated orthosis use orthosis use Factors n:30 n:11 Gender (male/female) 22 (73%)/8(27%) 8 (73%)/3 (27%) Sacral sparing 17(57%)/13(43%) 2 (18%)/9 (82%) (complete/incomplete) Spasticity 9 (30%) 4 (36%) Clonus 5 (17%) 2 (18%) Application and removal 14 (47%)/16 (53%) 4 (36%)/7 (64%) of orthosis (independent/need help) Ambulation level 6 (20%)/20(80%) 5 (45%)/6 (54%) (Community/therapeutic) Odds ratio (95% confidence p Factors interval) value Gender (male/female) 0.
Clinicians that only use Babinski sign and ankle clonus in the lower extremities to evaluate for the possibility of upper motor neuron disease should consider expanding the scope of their neurologic evaluation.
On examination, he had brisk tendon reflexes with ankle clonus, spastic quadriparesis, and decreased proprioceptive sensation in the lower limbs with preserved vibration sense.
Clinical f indings of tachycardia and vomiting would suggest theophylline toxicity, whereas tremor, ataxia, and clonus may indicate lithium poisoning.
Hyperreflexia was noted in the lower extremities, with sustained ankle clonus on the right and bilateral Babinski signs.
Spasticity, caused by a lesion in the cerebral cortex, affects approximately 50% of persons with cerebral palsy, and is characterized by stiffness, contracted muscles, hyperactive reflexes, hypertonicity, clonus, absence of balance, and jerky uncontrolled movements.
Baclofen is useful for the alleviation of signs and symptoms of spasticity resulting from multiple sclerosis, particularly for the relief of flexor spasms and concomitant pain, clonus, and muscular rigidity.
She had no nystagmus, but had hyperreflexia with 4 beats of clonus.
Motor system assessment showed no paresis in the upper extremities but manual muscle testing in the lower extremities revealed grade 4 muscle strength in the key muscles and clonus.
Muscle tone is increased, plantars are upgoing, and clonus is seen with more advanced disease.
Physical examination: * Vital signs * Skin tone and color paying particular attention to lower extremities * Palpate peripheral pulses * Assess for peripheral edema * Asses motor strength of bilateral lower extremities * Assess light touch, pin prick, and vibration in extremities * Assess straight leg raising * Asses DTRs, clonus, Hoffman's * Assess spinal range of motion I * Assess gait, tandem walking, and Romberg * If patient has any red flag symptoms (i.
Conversely, this study excluded, after previous pilot tests, patients unable to walk autonomously and needing an influential external body-weight support during gait, provided by a therapist or a walker, and patients with lower-limb muscle clonus during walking (Figure 2, more details in "Results" section).