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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Jim Bailey, who oversaw the birth of the latest clone, said: "From the time I transferred the embryo into the recipient mare, the pregnancy was normal in every way and the birth followed suit.
The reason for the high prevalence of this virulent clone (pulsotype C:ST59, SCCmec V, PVL-positive) of MRSA in Taiwan in both inpatients and outpatients is not known.
(5) It makes economic sense to clone any top-of-the-line horse, whether a racehorse or not.
Taking stem cells from a clone requires that scientists first create an embryo and then destroy it.
Two Christmases ago, there came news of a child born--the world's first baby clone. Researchers linked to a religious sect announced the supposed breakthrough, causing what might have been moral panic, in normal circumstances.
When the organ was not rejected by the animal and produced urine, the media proclaimed it a "therapeutic cloning success." Thanks to the new law, such an experiment using a human clone would be perfectly legal in New Jersey.
Figure 3A illustrates the mean [+ or -] SEM intensity values for each of the cDNA clones arranged in order of their expression.
If a cloned sheep spawned CC's creator Genetic Savings and Clone, where pet owners can bank Fido's DNA, then what could spring from cloned humans?
Because all clones made to date were defined as experimental, we produced them for free.
Some clones have been born with serious medical problems.
Only a few clones continued to express the proper amount of Oct4 and reached the stage where they could produce stem cells-about day 6 or 7.
Engineered this way or simply taken from a tissue, differentiated cells from therapeutic clones should not be rejected by the immune system when they are used to treat the donor's own illness; instead, they have the better chance to become a new form of medicine, a tissue replacement treatment designed solely for the one person who donates the nucleus.