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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

(klōn)
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, e.g., plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.clo´nal

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

clone

Etymology: Gk, klon, a plant cutting
a group of genetically identical cells or organisms derived from a single common cell or organism through mitosis. clonal, adj.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy

clone

progeny derived from a single cell by asexual reproduction

clone

1. the genetically identical or closely similar progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell or gene, e.g. plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.

clone bank
see gene bank.
clone site
the site where insertion of the transfer DNA segment may occur on a cloning vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said the clone is reliable in producing a good crop, though it isn't immune to smaller crops, such as what happened in 2011 where all varieties suffered losses due to a long, cold season.
He added that the Dijon clones ripen earlier and are more complex and produce more food-friendly wine.
8%) of MRSA isolates in Taiwan could be this closely related virulent clone.
A conservative "ramp up" approach to the operational deployment of clones is best.
Were such legislation to become the law, then women would be held properly responsible and accountable to assure that a therapeutic clone would not become a person.
In fact, livestock producers can go online and order a clone of an award-winning cow or bull if so desired.
For if nurture triumphs over nature, then a clone will be an individual as unique as any other, determined for the most part by the environment in which she or he was reared.
She is a clone, the petri-dish concoction of a group of veterinary researchers who transferred the nucleus of a mammary cell from Dolly's "mother" into an enucleated sheep egg, that is, an unfertilized egg from which the natural nucleus had been microsurgically removed, then nurtured, implanted, and finally birthed the results.
7 Steve Mansfield, "Don't Send in the Clones," QST, November 1997, 16.