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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Dolly, the cloned sheep, passed away at age 6 as she had developed lung disease and severe arthritis.
Whenever a new species is cloned people want to know if it is a step towards cloning humans.
Also, reported by (http://www.livescience.com/16589-faq-cloning-animals.html) Live Science , currently cloned animals also experience poor health.
Cloned sheep had normal blood sugar levels, insulin levels and blood pressure.
Scientists long sought cloned human embryos because their pluripotent stem cells would be genetically matched to potential patients (whose genetic material could be used to create the embryos).
"After Injaz, we have successfully cloned many camels, ranging from racing champions to elite bulls to beauty camels.
Hitler was cloned in The Boys From Brazil, while an army of them featured in the Star Wars prequels.
The Council agreed only to label fresh beef, which MEPs found insufficient given that a 2008 Eurobarometer study shows 63 per cent of EU citizens are unlikely to buy food from cloned animals, while 61 per cent find animal cloning morally wrong.
A European Commission statement to MEPs in Strasbourg said the offspring of cloned animals could enter the food chain and that more research was needed on any health hazards associated with cloned animals.
The news broke after three cloned cattle were found in the food chain in Britain, with an estimated dozens more living on farms across the country.
But news that embryos of cloned cows have been imported and born on British farms is a reminder that cloning, while relatively new, could become a realistic and mainstream method of food production.
A DAIRY industry body said last night it was "confident" no milk from the offspring of cloned animals has entered the human food chain in the UK.