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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.