clonality


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clonality

 [klo-nal´ĭ-te]
the ability to be cloned.

clonality

/clo·nal·i·ty/ (klo-nal´ĭ-te) the ability to be cloned.

clonality

A state of proliferation determined by the cell(s) of origin; daughter cells arising from multiple cells–ie polyclonal are reactive in nature, while those arising from a single cell–ie monoclonal are neoplastic; determining clonality is important in treating a disease, and understanding its physiopathology, and can be assessed in ♀ by molecular analysis of the patterns of X chromosome inactivation. See Clonal analysis.

clonality

the ability to form clones.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Clonality analysis was performed using amplification on three frame woke of IGH (VH FR1-Jh, Vh FR2-Jh, and VH FR3-JH) gene rearrangements using the multiplex PCR protocols suggested by BIOMED-2 [14].
However, bottlenecks are characteristic of many population of Phaedranassa, including those that do not show significant degrees of clonality (Oleas, 2011).
Immunohistochemical identification of RI tissues could be used not only as part of the clonality assays to identify tumors but also to compare lymphoma cell types in other rodent assays and in humans.
Follow-up and treatment of patients with HES should include monitoring for cytogenetic and molecular evidence of clonality, which would indicate a myeloproliferative disease rather than HES.
hematopathologist and co-investigator at Cleveland Clinic said, This is an important advance in our ability to accurately diagnose B-cell lymphomas because conventional IHC (immunohistochemistry) and CISH (chromogenic in situ hybridization) methods to establish clonality simply don t work for the majority of NHLs for various reasons .
fortuitum isolates showed sufficient genetic diversity to exclude clonality (Figure 1).
It incorporates advances in the field such as the renewed focus on the innate immune system, clarification of the role of regulatory (suppressor) T lymphocytes in the immune response and identification of several functional subsets of these cells, the role of key immunological molecules in immune responses, and polymerase chain reaction-based tests for the diagnosis of infection and detection of clonality of neoplastic lymphoid populations.
The fluid specimen was positive for a large B-cell lymphoma based on morphological characteristics and the B-cell clonality found on the kappa gene rearrangement study by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (Figure 2).
A polymerase chain reaction gene rearrangement study showed B-cell clonality.
Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to identify the clonality of the V.
Examples of topics covered include the plasma cell labeling index, multicolor spectral karyotyping, detection of chromosome 13 deletions by fluorescent in situ hybridization, identification and of clonotypic IgH VDJ sequences, real-time polymerase chain reaction of immunoglobulin rearrangements for quantitative evaluation of minimal residual disease, determination of telomerase activity and telomere length, clonality detection of the expanded t-cell populations in patients with multiple myeloma, and use of DNA micrrarray data.