clinical

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clinical

 [klin´ĭ-k'l]
pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside; pertaining to or founded on actual observation and treatment of patients, as distinguished from theoretical or experimental.
clinical laboratory scientist/medical technologist (CLS/MT) a laboratory professional who has all the skills possessed by a clinical laboratory technician as well as the ability to perform complex analyses, fine line discrimination, and correction of errors. This technologist assumes responsibility and is held accountable for accurate results and establishes and monitors quality control and quality assurance programs, designing or modifying procedures as necessary. Academic programs are accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Certification as MT is through the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, whose address is P.O. Box 12270, Chicago, IL 60612 (telephone 312-738-1336). Certification as CLT is through the National Credentialing Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. The address of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences is 7910 Woodmont Ave., Suite 1301, Bethesda, MD 20814 (telephone 301-657-2768).
clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician (CLT/MLT) a laboratory professional skilled in the performance of clinical laboratory analyses. Associate degree or certificate programs are accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, whose address is 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631 (telephone 773-714-8880). Certification as MLT(ASCP) is through the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, whose address is P.O. Box 12270, Chicago, IL 60612 (telephone 312-738-1336). Certification as CLT is through the National Credentialing Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel, whose address is P.O. Box 15945-289, Lenexa, KS 66285 (telephone 913-438-5110).

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl),
1. Relating to the bedside of a patient or to the course of the disease.
2. Denoting the symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from the laboratory findings of anatomic changes.
3. Relating to a clinic.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

clinical

(klĭn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or connected with a clinic.
2. Involving or based on direct observation of a patient: a clinical diagnosis; clinical research.

clin′i·cal·ly adv.

clinical

adjective
1. Pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside; that which can be observed in Pts .
2. Pertaining to or based on observation and management of Pts, in contrast to theoretical or basic sciences.

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl)
1. Relating to the bedside of a patient.
2. Denoting the symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from the laboratory findings or anatomic changes.
3. Relating to a clinic.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

clinical

1. Concerned with the immediate observation, examination and treatment of patients.
2. Relating to a CLINIC.

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl)
Denoting symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from laboratory findings of anatomic changes.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

Patient discussion about clinical

Q. Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question? Can acupuncture help reduce the pain in fibromyalgia? Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question?

A. Yes, acupuncture therapy can reduce the fatigue, widespread pain and sleep problems associated with fibromyalgia. If acupuncture can be used in place of pain reliever then its good as the side effect associated with pain relievers are reduced.

Q. I want to know what causes clinical depression? My friend is diagnosed with clinical depression. He is showing signs for the past six months. We found this when he lost interest in music which was his soul before. He lost interest in all other activities including hang out with us. We were wondering what could be the reason for the drastic change in his behavior. Very recently he stopped attending school also. We have tried to contact him but in vain. Then we got to know from his brother that he feels very low and depressed and is diagnosed with clinical depression? I want to know what causes clinical depression?

A. Any neurotransmitters imbalance in the brain can cause the mood to go down. This makes the person depressed. This can happen due to genetic impact. The social or financial difficulty can cause the disturbances in neurotransmitters, which causes depression in a person. Try to know from him whether he has any history of failures which he is hiding within him. Try to know the exact cause of depression. Depression, if left unattended, could develop in to Bipolar Disorder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BloACoqVs1o&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vBloACoqVs1o_cathy_tells_ppd_postpartum_depression_story?q=post%20partum%20depr&feature=player_embedded

Q. What's the difference between clinical depression that needs treating, and just regularly being depressed? I'm often depressed, and i just wondered what the difference is between just being depressed, and clinical? At what point does depression become depression?

A. It depends on the duration of the episodes, the frequency and severity. Even psychiatrists have trouble to pinpoint it. They often disagree on the “borderly” cases, here is some info on the diagnose of depression:
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/35222/362840.html?d=dmtContent

More discussions about clinical
References in periodicals archive ?
The study compared 62 patients who had clinically apparent tophi at baseline and 23 patients who did not.
By comparison, maximum daily doses of ibuprofen (2,400 mg) and naproxen (1,000 mg) had 83% and 78% probability, respectively, of achieving clinically important reductions.
Conclusion: We conclude that although frequency is low the possibility of malignancy in clinically benign enlarged prostate should be borne in mind whenever subjecting the patient for screening, assessment and treatment.
indirect medical costs, nonmedical costs, and productivity losses] (Mean cost of [outcome.sub.clinically defined early-stage LD, clinically defined late-stage LD, suspected LD, tick bite, and other related complaints] X Probability of [outcome.sub.
"Long-term chronic health conditions associated with posttraumatic stress disorder may be less likely to occur among patients who experience clinically meaningful symptom reduction through treatment or spontaneous improvement," the authors write.
When patients were removed from their medication and only used the nasal spray, the Non-Steroidal Nasal Spray demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant increase in all lung functions including FEV-1, SaO2, PEF, FVC and nitric oxide.
van der Vuurst de Vries and her colleagues analyzed data from 229 patients with a CIS who underwent an MRI of the spinal cord to assess for dissemination in space (DIS); of these, 180 patients were scored for both DIS and dissemination in time (DIT) and had a "baseline MRI scan that included TI images after gadolinium administration or scans that did not show any T2 hyperintense lesions." Some patients also underwent a baseline lumbar puncture if clinically required.
A series of drug metabolism, drug-to-drug interaction, and transporter studies demonstrated that cytisine has no clinically significant interaction with any of the hepatic enzymes commonly responsible for drug metabolism nor clinically significant interaction with drug transporters.
The result is an effective ingredient that delivers clinically proven benefits in hydration & barrier building as well as skin roughness, dryness, elasticity, tone, fine lines, wrinkles and radiance.
The man was arrested on January 22 after he allegedly beat his mother and left her clinically dead.
Counties of origin for birds with clinically significant metal levels were identified.
It was ensured that there was no air leak present before removal clinically and radiologically.

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