clinical psychology


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Related to clinical psychology: forensic psychology

psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

clin·i·cal psy·chol·o·gy

a branch of psychology that specializes in both discovering new knowledge and in applying the art and science of psychology to people with emotional or behavioral disorders; subspecialties include clinical child psychology and pediatric psychology.

clinical psychology

the branch of psychology concerned with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of a wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. See also applied psychology.

clinical psychology

The field of health care which assesses and treats behavioural and other mental health problems. In the UK, clinical psychologists often belong to a multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurses and social care workers who manage patients with mental disorders.

clinical psychology

Psychology A field that applies psychologic principles to assessing, preventing, ameliorating and rehabilitating mental distress, disability, dysfunctional behavior, and enhance psychologic well-being. See Psychology.

clin·i·cal psy·chol·o·gy

(klin'i-kăl sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
A branch of psychology that specializes in both discovering new knowledge and in applying the art and science of psychology to patients with emotional or behavioral disorders; subspecialities include clinical child psychology and pediatric psychology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Troiani, PhD, is an associate professor of Clinical Psychology and Founder of the Psy.
In recent decades, clinical psychology has acknowledged the importance of values and religious beliefs in psychotherapy (Abernethy & Lancia, 1998; Bergin, 1991; Kelly, 1990).
However, we are seeing more interest from the government in social work and social policy systems which will enable clinical psychology to grow along with those interests," Dr Crookes said.
Newman College's head of psychology, Dr Tony Ward, said: "As the first MSc offered at Newman it also fits in well with our increasing emphasis on applied work relevant to counselling, health and clinical psychology
Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 63, 495-498.
Meyers, "Aggression and Psychopathology in Childhood Firesetters: Parent and Child Reports," Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 53 (1985): 377-385; and supra note 12 (Kolko and Kazdin, 1988).
She has encouraged research on effects of energy therapies on a number of different types of problems and has recently been invited to teach EFT to clinical psychology students at Rutgers' Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology.
Clinical psychology doctoral programs with evangelical Protestant affiliations have granted one of two degrees: a Doctor of Philosophy in psychology (PhD), or a Doctor of Psychology (PsyD).
Our clinical psychology program deans, leaders and faculty have demonstrated their commitment to our students and to their profession through this process and that shows in achieving continued accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of the APA.
Rand are graduate students with the Clinical Psychology Program.
Admission requirements, acceptance rates, and financial assistance in clinical psychology programs: Diversity across the practice-research continuum.

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