clinical pathology

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pathology

 [pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs that cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease. adj., adj patholog´ic, patholog´ical.
clinical pathology pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis.
comparative pathology that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of other animals.
experimental pathology the study of artificially induced pathologic processes.
oral pathology that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomic or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
speech pathology (speech-language pathology) a field of the health sciences dealing with the evaluation of speech, language, and voice disorders and the rehabilitation of patients with such disorders not amenable to medical or surgical treatment. See also speech-language pathologist.
surgical pathology the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

clin·i·cal pa·thol·o·gy

1. any part of the medical practice of pathology as it pertains to the care of patients;
2. the subspecialty in pathology concerned with the theoretical and technical aspects (that is, the methods or procedures) of chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, parasitology, immunology, hematology, and other fields as they pertain to the diagnosis of disease and the care of patients, as well as to the prevention of disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chemical pathology

The pathology specialty in the UK which is involved in measuring electrolytes, metabolic products, hormones, proteins and toxins in blood, urine and other body fluids to diagnose and monitor disease.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

clinical pathology

The field of pathology dedicated to measuring and/or identifying substances, cells, or microorganisms in body fluids Areas Clinical microbiology–bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology; immunology; chemistry; hematology; immunohematology–blood banking. Cf Anatomic pathology, Surgical pathology.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

clin·i·cal pa·thol·o·gy

(klin'i-kăl pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
1. Any part of the medical practice of pathology as it pertains to the care of patients.
2. pathology Subspecialty concerned with the theoretic and technical aspects of chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, parasitology, immunology, hematology, and other fields as they pertain to the diagnosis of disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

clinical pathology

The science and practice of medical diagnosis by laboratory examination and analysis of tissue specimens (BIOPSIES), body fluids and other samples. Clinical pathology is subdivided into VIROLOGY, BACTERIOLOGY, clinical chemistry, SEROLOGY and pathological HISTOLOGY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Ward rounds now regularly include the ward doctors, the ward nurses, a pharmacist, the clinical pathologist and the institutional infection control nurse, as well as the IGH fellow.
The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists have recognized medical consultancy as a key competency of clinical pathologists (22).
Concern for clinical pathologists' constraint of clinical laboratory scientists' practice has moderated in the years since ASCP became independent from the College of American Pathologists and as the CLS profession has grown in numbers, representation, and stature.
Perhaps, because their president was a clinical pathologist, the JCRS repeatedly demonstrated both that they were proud of their clinical laboratory and that it was world class" (66-68) (Figure 5).
First, what defines a clinical pathologist? The answer to this question provides the foundation for defining residency training goals.
A clinical pathologist now retired from Venice General Hospital (Italy), Ortolani has assembled from a series of diagnostic notes a guide to one of the most difficult applications of flow cytometry, which requires both a good knowledge of hematopathology and good control of the technique.
This should not be viewed as meaning that there must be direct, face-to-face patient contact as the primary activity of the clinical pathologist, but rather that the clinical pathologist's role is to treat the human condition of disease and health, albeit most frequently from a population-based orientation.
That the clinical pathologist shall attend the monthly staff conferences of the hospital....
Statland spent his professional life as a clinical pathologist, clinical chemist, researcher, professor, government servant, and attorney.
At these gatherings, besides the presentation of scientific papers, informal discussions were held on the status of the clinical pathologist and his relation to the clinician.
Your institution undoubtedly has an alert system in place that was developed by your clinical pathologist with the medical staff.

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