client

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client

 [kli´ent]
the term most often used as a synonym for a patient who receives health care in an ambulatory care setting, especially when health maintenance rather than illness care is the primary service provided. Sometimes this term is preferred to denote a collaborative relationship rather than a hierarchical one.

client

A program that makes a service request of another program, usually running on a server, which then fulfills the request. Web browsers are clients that request HTML files from web servers.

client

Psychology Patient Any person who is voluntarily or involuntarily receiving mental health services or substance abuse services from any mental health service provider

cli·ent

(klī'ĕnt)
A patron or customer; one who receives a professional service from another; one who seeks or receives advice or therapy from a health care professional.
Compare: patient
[L. cliens, protégé, dependent]

Patient discussion about client

Q. I ask a client's Dr. to script flexaril for a lower back spasm and he made it for a drug called zanaflex? I am unfamiliar with zanaflex, what is the difference between it and flexaril 25mg? Benefits? Risks? I got him to order the air mattress and extended bed because client is 6'3" and is already bedridden on my 1st day..try to beat the skin breakdown, already stage I decubitis ulcers. I tried to talk the client into slideboard and lift away arm wheelchair...noway..he wants to walk bent with a rolling walker. He already had a lift chair delivered, so he just goes from bed to lift chair. He refuses to let me bathe him. He can't see, and he has me check his draw up on insulin to make sure it's right. He sends the P.T. man right back out the door after he signs the sheet. Difficult pt.!

A. Flexeril and Zanaflex are different drugs but are both muscle relaxants. There are hardly any differences between the two, clinically wise. If the doctor thought one is better than the other for your client I would suggest you take his advice and use the one he gave you.

More discussions about client
References in periodicals archive ?
They are also similar in several other respects as both are clientage and rentier states.
"Friendship and Clientage in Early Modern France." French History 6.2 (1992): 139-58.
Malcolm Walsby provides a great deal of precise information on clientage that will deepen any general study of the subject.
(8) Even an enormous poverty-relief program like Mexico's PRONASOL, which spent over one percent of the country's GDP per year for five years, will not relieve poverty if the funds are primarily used by public officials to support the ruling party through electioneering and clientage. (9)
He argues that although the crown insisted on tethering the colonies already in the Habsburg period, the superseding impact of clientage foiled most of these attempts.
The role played by clientage networks in directing the political history of medieval and early modern Europe has long been a subject of inquiry among historians of the nobility.
An example of such a descriptive sentence is: Article discusses the clientage system [system of patron-client relationships based on personal bonds of loyalty] in France during the Wars of Religion [1562-1598]; the author suggests that there was no failure or collapse of the system during the Wars, though many clients did change their loyalty between Catholic and Calvinist patrons.
Power and Solidarity: Clientage in Domestic Service.
(3) Theophile is product and prisoner of the clientage system, that is, the client-patron relationship, which subordinates the lesser to the greater nobility by the bonds of loyalty through patronage.
Clientage in the PRC's National Defense Research and Development Sector.
This is obvious in the way in which `friendship' provided the only effective or acceptable language for discussing ties of political patronage and clientage in the Ming period (much as it did in early modern Europe also).
The reader can observe how kinship, friendship, community of interest, geographic origin, and prior clientage played a role in the pope's patronage policy.