clerk


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Related to clerk: bank clerk, law clerk

clerk

 [klerk]
an employee who keeps records and does other general office work.
unit clerk (ward clerk) a worker on a nursing unit who schedules patients for prescribed studies, prepares charts for patients, answers the phone on the unit, and handles other general clerical tasks. In some provinces of Canada, ward clerks of certain types of facilities are also trained to transcribe orders. Called also unit secretary.

clerk

verb To take a full history, perform a physical examination, record one’s findings in the patient’s notes, and write a problem list and care plan.
References in classic literature ?
"I have told him a dozen times,--for after all one ought to tell the truth to an honest clerk, and what I call an honest clerk is one like that little fellow who gives us "recta" his ten francs on New-Year's day,--I have said to him again and again: The more you work the more they'll make you work, and they won't promote you.
He directed me to the clerk's abode, a cottage at some little distance off, standing by itself on the outskirts of the forsaken village.
hem!" said the clerk breathlessly, and quite exhausted he seated himself on a bank.
Her friend the reception clerk was engaged in conversation with one or two men, a conversation of which she was obviously the subject.
The clerks surveyed him with great curiosity, and he, not knowing well what to say to this ascending and descending scale, remained tongue-tied.
Vronsky saw all the thanklessness of the business, and that there could be no question of a duel in it, that everything must be done to soften the government clerk, and hush the matter up.
When I told the clerk that I would take a turn in the air while I waited, he advised me to go round the corner and I should come into Smithfield.
"So the jeweller thought," crowed the clerk. "You see, it wasn't as if the Yanks had chosen out the half of what he'd brought on appro.; they'd gone slow on purpose, and they'd paid for all.
Goodworthy led Philip through the dingy office, where now six or eight clerks were working, into a narrow room behind.
"And as a proof," added the clerk, "here are the desecrator's very shoes, which he left behind him."
That same night the clerk entered upon a bout of drunkenness so consistent as to surprise even his intimate acquaintance.
'Oh, no, I'm sure it wouldn't,' replied the clerk, moving a little more into the centre of the doorway.