intellectual

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intellectual

1. Pert. to the mind.
2. Possessing intellect.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Church and State, Coleridge advocates a form of social organization in which the balance between opposing and mutually regulating structures is maintained by an external organization of trustee-like figures, the clerisy.
The existence of a clerisy would seem to signify a meritocratic rather than an egalitarian society.
The Clerisy is, Kotkin says, increasingly uniform in its views, and its power stems from ''persuading, instructing and regulating the rest of society.
It comes not from the clerisy but from the rising power of the well-connected insider.
This is not because the market is corrosive but because the clerisy, enmeshed in its fantasy of fighting the market, has failed to provide people with a way to understand their work more deeply.
Indeed, more than a few members of the South's clerisy openly admitted that the revolt had forced them into a more self-conscious inquiry into the institution of slavery itself.
Chapter eight, for example, "An Examination of Disputation" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], not only exhibits trenchant criticism of the disputation of the School of Names (Mingjia [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), and reflects the prevailing sentiment of the late Han clerisy that the glib were want to use shallow and misleading disputation to secure favor and official position, but also offers still useful advice sure to appeal to readers today, e.
However, in his revolutionary wish for the study of literature to provide an alternate clerisy and to preserve reading of the Bible not for religious but for literary purposes, he exhibited an unstable tension that has bedeviled our guild for 150 years.
Once one hands over to a clerisy of pseudo-scientists (so fashion-crazed that they cannot even make up their minds from year to year whether electro-convulsive therapy is a blessing or a curse) the intellectual, juridical and moral authority which belongs to Christian institutions alone, it is of comparatively little importance whether you put these pseudo-scientists' victims on the streets, in strait-jackets, or for that matter atop the Empire State Building.
There are no elite assumptions here: the distinct and often repressed knowledge of women is a recurrent theme, and the skills of working practitioners are found in constant dialogue with the theoretical wisdom of the clerisy.
Progressivism, however, is all about bringing to bear on society the fabulous expertise of a disinterested clerisy.
As members of a class and as individual instantiations of a national institution, the members of the clerisy thus complete in Hamilton's view the Hegelian "move from self-consciousness to Spirit" (32).