intellectual

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intellectual

1. Pert. to the mind.
2. Possessing intellect.
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References in periodicals archive ?
No more need for a clerisy to voice the inaudible demands of the "voiceless." Mexican writers of the 21st century find themselves, grosso modo, in the same situation as their counterparts in the rest of North America: writing, publishing, often looking for grants and university connections.
For Oettinger and his fellow elitists, the ideal society is one in which the vast majority of people are minimally educated to a sub-literate comic-book level; a collectivized social order of unthinking docile workers who are dependent on an intellectual clerisy (Oettinger and company) for informational sustenance.
Pattison's was that of the officially sanctioned clerisy. The son of an Anglican parson, he entered the nation's intellectual establishment as an Oxford graduate, Church of England clergyman, and fellow and finally head of Lincoln College.
Its practitioners are not scientists but members of a secular clerisy drawn to some branch or other of quasitheological speculation.
Having long noted the political and social ramifications of the supposedly systematic interpretation of legal precedent lying at the heart of the common law, Coleridge suggests that a group of cultural trustees, the Clerisy, could perform a quasi-judicial role to guide reading in the public sphere.
I believe I see its avian counterpart in the thirteenth chapter of book 2 of the Venerable Bede's (672?-735) Ecclesiastical History of the English People, a text that would become almost as well known among the clerisy of the Latin West as was Zhuangzi among Chinese scholars.
But this view was already dated and today seems almost as remote as Samuel Taylor Coleridge's idea of a clerisy. The logical positivist Ayer's rejection of transcendental reality and insistence upon empirical verification may have led him to claim that philosophy has little to say about current issues.
He discusses such topics as the incompleteness of philosophy alone, the anti-philosophy philosophy of Epicurus and Rousseau, Coleridge's notion of the clerisy, and sacramentally rooted thought.
Among the clerisy, the intelligentsia of Christendom, the fatal propensity developed to treat ideas as more important than people.
As a hitherto unwitting member of Dierdre McCloskey's 'clerisy' ('The Discreet Virtues of the Bourgeoisie'), yet staunchly bourgeois, your September 2006 edition has left me confused.
Even if the clerisy are deceitful votaries of a corrupt bureaucracy, Radcliffe seems to say, one has to pity their sequestration from natural glory (Udolpho 639).