intellectual

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intellectual

1. Pert. to the mind.
2. Possessing intellect.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Church and State, Coleridge erects a constitutional scheme to enable a national reading community guided by this clerisy, so that the circulation of print through that community will result in readings of literary and legal texts regulated by a shared sense of custom and value.
They rarely speak of the glories of medieval and Renaissance Europe, or of lessons from the now vanished clerisy and aristocracy.
735) Ecclesiastical History of the English People, a text that would become almost as well known among the clerisy of the Latin West as was Zhuangzi among Chinese scholars.
But this view was already dated and today seems almost as remote as Samuel Taylor Coleridge's idea of a clerisy.
He discusses such topics as the incompleteness of philosophy alone, the anti-philosophy philosophy of Epicurus and Rousseau, Coleridge's notion of the clerisy, and sacramentally rooted thought.
Among the clerisy, the intelligentsia of Christendom, the fatal propensity developed to treat ideas as more important than people.
Even if the clerisy are deceitful votaries of a corrupt bureaucracy, Radcliffe seems to say, one has to pity their sequestration from natural glory (Udolpho 639).
Following a long and generally fruitless effort by Southern writers during the Reconstruction era and early modern period to defend the Southern past, a Southern renascence arose in which, for the first time, Southern writers joined in the work of the modern literary clerisy to resist those forces of mechanization and abstraction that were at odds with an older civilization of myth and memory.
It reads rather like a candidate's essay for entry to membership of the US academic inner clerisy via an elaborately obscure text on an almost impenetrably dull topic.
The Portuguese clergy sustained a religious message in which women indeed found high social authority in the context of a divine purpose and Mariolatry, but only when sanctified by a clerisy restricted to males.
THE MEDIA CLERISY flatter themselves on inheriting the early twentieth-century muckraking tradition of investigative journalism.
7) Mill, notes Williams in the following pages, proposes a National Church, a whole class or Clerisy, with theology as the 'circulating sap and life', but the main aim of this new church was the cultivation of civilization and human perfection.