clemastine


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clemastine

 [klem´as-tēn]
an antihistamine with sedative and anticholinergic effects; used as the fumarate salt in the treatment of nasal, eye, and skin manifestations of allergic reactions, including allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and itching, and also as an ingredient in cough and cold preparations, administered orally.

clemastine

A sedating antihistamine and anticholinergic used for managing allergic rhinitis and hay fever.

Adverse effects
CNS depression or stimulation; the latter is more common in children and may be accompanied by excitement, hallucinations, ataxia, incoordination, spasms, athetosis, hyperthermia, cyanosis, hyperreflexia and cardiorespiratory arrest.

clemastine

An ANTIHISTAMINE drug used to treat hay fever and other allergic conditions. A brand name is Tavegil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allergy Drugs: Carbinoxamine, Chlorpheniramine, Clemastine, Diphenhydramine, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Cyproheptadine
Clemastine has been shown to improve function in multiple sclerosis by activating oligodendrocyte precursor cells into active agents of myelination and fiber bundle stabilization.
treated 13 Caucasian adults presenting to the ED for ACEI-induced angioedema of the upper aerodigestive tract with icatibant and found a significantly shorter time to complete resolution of ACEI-induced angioedema compared to combination glucocorticoid plus antihistamine (prednisolone plus clemastine) therapy within 10 hours of symptom onset.
To confirm the role of myelination in social isolation, clemastine treatment, which can promote OL differentiation and myelination, enhanced myelination in the PFC and rescued behavioral changes in socially isolated mice [48].
Volonte, "Actions of the antihistaminergic clemastine on presymptomatic SOD1-G93A mice ameliorate ALS disease progression," Journal of Neuroinflammation, vol.
This long sought-after result was achieved through the use of a common medication, the antihistamine clemastine fumarate, in the preliminary study presented in April to the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada.
Examples of these are hydroxyzine, diphenhydramine (Benadryl), clemastine (Tavist), and chlorpheniramine.
At this time, the prescription for the next 30 days included: (1) a strict spot-on tick and flea control every 21-28 days, added by environmental control, and oral nitenpyram (lmg[kg.sup.-1] every 48 hours for three times) when flea infestation was suspected; (2) weekly bathing with antiseptic and moisturizing shampoo was recommended; (3) external otitis was also treated, according to the ear canal cytology; (4) secondary fungal or bacterial infections were also treated, accordingly; (5) antihistamine (cetirizine, hydroxyzine or clemastine) in association, in most cases, with prednisone (0.5-lmg[kg.sup.-1] every 24 hours for 15-30 days) were prescribed in order to have pruritus controlled.
The four first-generation oral agents available over-the-counter (OTC) can be further classified, based on their chemical composition, into two groups: alkylamines (chlorpheniramine) and ethanolamines (clemastine, diphenhydramine, and doxylamine).
Although certain numbers of SJS cases have been reported on drugs such as clemastine, mequitazine and bromhexine from the FDA, the causative alleles in these cases may be different from HLA-A* 02:06.
Acetaminophen was stopped immediately and IV Clemastine (1mg) and IV Hydrocortisone (100 mg) together with Ringer Lactate solution were administered.