clearance

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Related to clearances: Sutherland Clearances

clear·ance

(klēr'ants),
1. Removal of a substance from the blood, for example, by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit of time; measured in mL/min. Renal clearance of any substance except urea or free water is calculated as the urine flow in mL/min multiplied by the urinary concentration of the substance divided by the arterial plasma concentration of the substance; normal human values are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; for example, esophageal acid clearance refers to removal from the esophagus of some acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

(klîr′əns)
n.
1. A space cleared; a clearing.
2.
a. The removal by the kidneys of a substance from blood plasma.
b. Renal clearance.
FDAspeak See Marketing clearance
Occupational medicine The amount of space above a worker’s head
Pharmacology A measure of the elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time
Pharmacokinetics The product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug’s elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr
Physiology
(1) The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion
(2) A quantitative measure of such a removal
Vox populi The amount of space between 2 closely related substances

clearance

Pharmacology The elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time; in terms of pharmacokinetics, clearance is the product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug's elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr. See Hepatic clearance, Renal clearance, Therapeutic drug monitoring, Total body clearance Physiology
1. The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion. See Nasal mucociliary clearance.
2. A quantitative measure of item 1.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
1. Indicated as C with a subscript to show the substance removed: removal of a substance from the blood, e.g., by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit time; measured in mL per minute; normal values in humans are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; e.g., "esophageal acid clearance" refers to removal from the esophagus of acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

1. The removal of a substance from the blood, usually by the kidneys.
2. The rate of such removal.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
Removal of something from an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, there exist three modes of the relative motion of clearance joint elements: the contact mode, the free flight mode, and the impact mode, which are all considered by most clearance models.
The online submission of applications will also speed up clearance processes, while maintaining the rigours of Environment Clearance process.
The shear rate/viscosity curve in accompanying graph shows a ratio in viscosity between the channel and the clearance of about 3.5:1 based on the calculated shear rates, with resulting viscosities being 3500 poise and 1000 poise for the channel and flight clearance, respectively.
"In other words, NBI is telling us that if you arrive at our office asking for a clearance, you will be gone in 600 seconds," he added.
It does not require great insight to realize that to be freely turning, a blade (or a cantilevered stator) must have a clearance gap between its tip and the engine casing (or hub).
Under a new arrangement, EDA members do not need to submit a diplomatic clearance request for each flight that transits the territory of another member.
Through certain other measures introduced in the RMS, the green channel clearances have improved from less than 10pc to 39pc, the official added.
In his letter, he asked whether JIDUK was his new clearance limit.
Another e-mail will be sent to the victim, containing a fake BIR tax clearance that demands payment of a certain amount, according to Dulay.
Newbold, an 18-year veteran of the security clearance process who has served under both Republican and Democratic presidents, said she warned her superiors that clearances "were not always adjudicated in the best interest of national security" -- and was retaliated against for doing so.