clearance


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clear·ance

(klēr'ants),
1. Removal of a substance from the blood, for example, by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit of time; measured in mL/min. Renal clearance of any substance except urea or free water is calculated as the urine flow in mL/min multiplied by the urinary concentration of the substance divided by the arterial plasma concentration of the substance; normal human values are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; for example, esophageal acid clearance refers to removal from the esophagus of some acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

(klîr′əns)
n.
1. A space cleared; a clearing.
2.
a. The removal by the kidneys of a substance from blood plasma.
b. Renal clearance.
FDAspeak See Marketing clearance
Occupational medicine The amount of space above a worker’s head
Pharmacology A measure of the elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time
Pharmacokinetics The product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug’s elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr
Physiology
(1) The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion
(2) A quantitative measure of such a removal
Vox populi The amount of space between 2 closely related substances

clearance

Pharmacology The elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time; in terms of pharmacokinetics, clearance is the product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug's elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr. See Hepatic clearance, Renal clearance, Therapeutic drug monitoring, Total body clearance Physiology
1. The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion. See Nasal mucociliary clearance.
2. A quantitative measure of item 1.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
1. Indicated as C with a subscript to show the substance removed: removal of a substance from the blood, e.g., by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit time; measured in mL per minute; normal values in humans are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; e.g., "esophageal acid clearance" refers to removal from the esophagus of acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

1. The removal of a substance from the blood, usually by the kidneys.
2. The rate of such removal.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
Removal of something from an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio said seeking clearance before making an innocent passage in one's territorial waters is not needed under UNCLOS.
'The issuance of the National Police Clearance started in 2018 in Luzon but will only be implemented in Antique by next week,' Darroca said.
The course, which lasted around 75 training hours distributed over 15 days, included training related to the work of customs agents, in addition to practical training, all modern laws related to customs, as well as customs procedures and exemptions, customs clearance, outstanding conditions of fees, and rules of origin and prevention.
Through certain other measures introduced in the RMS, the green channel clearances have improved from less than 10pc to 39pc, the official added.
These included 10 mine clearance assistance programmes in five years.
This section is more applicable to an en-route hold or a short-range clearance where ATC communication is unavailable.
Multiple newspapers, including The Washington Post, reported that Trump early last year directed then-chief of staff John Kelly to give Kushner a top-secret security clearance -- a move that made Kelly so uncomfortable that he documented the request in writing, according to current and former administration officials.
"I think that when the ministry had to approve all the pictures and videos taken by a drone, it probably went beyond the law," Juraj Dudascaron of the Association of Unmanned Vehicles and Systems (UAVAS) told Sme.In fact, the National Security Authority (NBUacute), which is responsible for explaining the law on classified information, has claimed on its website that the security clearance is required only in the case of "aerial remote sensing of the Earth and aerial metric shooting".
Together with the merger control clearances obtained in China, Israel, South Africa and Turkey, and clearances relating to foreign investments in Australia, Canada and the USA (CFIUS), Thales and Gemalto have now obtained 8 of the required 14 Regulatory Clearances.
A CLEARANCE store is set to close in Llandudno with 10 jobs under threat.