clavicle


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clavicle

 [klav´ĭ-k'l]
an elongated, slender, curved bone lying horizontally at the root of the neck, in the upper part of the thorax; called also collar bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices. adj., adj clavic´ular.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl), [TA] Avoid the misspelling clavical.
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint, its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA], collar bone

clavicle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint; its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA] , collar bone.

clavicle

The collar-bone, which runs from the upper and outer corner of the breastbone (sternum) to connect to a process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula).
Clavicleclick for a larger image
Fig. 108 Clavicle . Location on left side of a primate.

clavicle

a bone associated with the ventral side of the shoulder girdle on each side of many vertebrates. In humans it is the collar bone.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle.
Synonym(s): collar bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous classification systems have been proposed by different authors, but the Edinburg classification proposed by Robinson CM (1998) has been adopted for classification of clavicle fractures in our study.
In radiological examination, there was a lesion on the head of right clavicle protruding to mediastinum which was considered as hyperthrophy or osteophyte.
Similarly XSITRAY-FE, XSITRAY-CL, XSITRAY-EA, XSITRAY-EH and XSITRAY-KN consists of 12 Femur, 28 Clavicle, 6 Extremity & Ankle, 12 Extremity & Hand and 11 Knee bone images.
Thoracic outlet syndrome usually targets the structures near the clavicle. In case of surrounding muscles near the clavicle, the presence of neurovascular structures like a transverse cervical artery, the internal or external jugular veins, and thoracoacromial trunk significantly limits the choice of potential needle site.
In athletes, either professional or amateur [8],[9],[10] restoration of the clavicle length and early return to full activity with unimpaired function is of great importance.
In regard to the neuronal anatomy and clinical experience, the combined interscalene-cervical plexus block seems to be an effective block and may be a promising method for sufficient surgical anesthesia in clavicle surgery.
Closed reduction with a clamp was attempted, but grasping the clavicle was impossible due to excessive subcutaneous emphysema.
In a previous study [7], two out of thirty-seven (5.4%) cases had cephalic vein crossed anteriorly and above the lateral third of the clavicle and terminated in the neck by draining directly into the external jugular vein.
He was indicated for repeat operative intervention and underwent a revision open right distal clavicle resection.
The precipitating event is typically a direct to the lateral shoulder (being thrown over the handlebars); however, this mechanism more commonly causes A joint injuries and clavicle fractures; which are reported as the most frequent traumatic injuries in cycling.
Moreover, we investigated the effect of tunnel positions on the quality of AC joint reduction by standardizing the various tunneling points on the clavicle and the coracoid process to determine whether the initial quality of reduction is positively correlated with postoperative radiological outcomes.
In 1972 Weaver and Dunn first described the treatment of AC dislocations through excision of the lateral border of the clavicle and transfer of the coracoacromial ligament to the clavicle [4].