clavicle


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clavicle

 [klav´ĭ-k'l]
an elongated, slender, curved bone lying horizontally at the root of the neck, in the upper part of the thorax; called also collar bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices. adj., adj clavic´ular.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl), [TA] Avoid the misspelling clavical.
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint, its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA], collar bone

clavicle

/clav·i·cle/ (klav´ĭ-k'l) collar bone; a bone, curved like the letter f, that articulates with the sternum and scapula, forming the anterior portion of the shoulder girdle on either side.clavic´ular

clavicle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.

clavicle

[klav′ikəl]
Etymology: L, clavicula, little key
a long curved, horizontal bone directly above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the acromion of the scapula and accommodates the attachment of numerous muscles. It is shorter, thinner, less curved, and smoother in the female than in the male and is thicker, more curved, and more prominently ridged for muscle attachment in persons performing consistent strenuous manual labor. Also called collarbone (informal).

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint; its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA] , collar bone.

clavicle

The collar-bone, which runs from the upper and outer corner of the breastbone (sternum) to connect to a process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula).
Clavicleclick for a larger image
Fig. 108 Clavicle . Location on left side of a primate.

clavicle

a bone associated with the ventral side of the shoulder girdle on each side of many vertebrates. In humans it is the collar bone.
Figure 1: The nervous system.

clavicle

the collar bone. Can be fractured in contact sports or with a fall on the outstretched arm. Figure 1.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle.
Synonym(s): collar bone.

clavicle (klav´ikəl),

n a long, curved, horizontal bone just above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the scapula.

clavicle

the collar bone; reduced or absent from many domestic animals but present in animals that can grasp with their forelimbs such as the cat and primates. See also clavicular intersection.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Enthesopathy adjacent to peripheral joints is common, and sites, such as the distal clavicle, greater and lesser tubercles, pelvis, tibial spine, heel, patella, and olecranon, have been identified as locations of increased calcification and ossification in DISH.
Consequently, we selected a Knowles pin for intramedullary fixation to treat the clavicle shaft nonunion after plate removal.
Type 5-Avulsion fracture of distal clavicle with the smaller cortical fragment remains attached to the CC ligament.
11) The subclavian vein is located just before it dives under the angle of the clavicle.
Clavicle fractures are classified into three types based on anatomical location.
The distribution of bony lesions can aid diagnosis, with lower limbs and clavicles commonly affected as seen in this case although the diaphysis involvement is relatively uncommon.
The outcome of surgical fixation of midshaft clavicle fractures; looking at patient satisfaction and comparing surgical approaches.
Radiographs showed dislocation of the left ACJ (type III according to Rockwood's classification) with fractures of the posteromedial surface of the coracoid process and of the inferior surface of the clavicle [11] (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)).
Acute clavicle fractures were traditionally treated nonoperatively.
Thus, the clavicle is considered the first bone to ossify and the last epiphysis to fuse.
Total number of clavicle was 61 as some clavicles contained nutrient foramina on both inferior and posterior surfaces [Table 2].