clava

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gracile tu·ber·cle

the somewhat expanded upper end of the gracile fasciculus, corresponding to the position of the gracile nucleus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

clava

(klā′vă) plural.clavae [L., club]
An elevation on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata caused by the underlying nucleus gracilis, the superior extremity of the fasciculus gracilis.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
As a superfan, Claver also can't help but delight in turning students on to the show's entertainment value.
By the time the young Claver arrived in Cartagena from Spain in 1610, the slave trade was already booming.
Alexander Claver's monograph provides an excellent overview of Dutch financial involvement with the island of Java.
At the same time, Maria Malaya, spokesperson of the communist National Democratic Front, the political arm of the 45-year old Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) and its armed wing, the NPA, claimed responsibility for the three attacks on mining firms which were accused of repressing workers right, failing to pay regional taxes, and ravaging Surigao's Claver town for 30 years.
Some call the one without, claver cross, Persian cross, Chaldean cross or Manichean cross.
The Titans' Rachel Jensen finished just one spot behind Claver with a time of 19:04.37.
Peter Claver, told New Orleans' Catholic newspaper that the money would enable him to hire more staff and expand its program.
Scenarist turned helmer Claver Salizzato's first feature overreaches and comes up with a steaming fist of cardboard alla carbonara in the form of "Days of Grace," a would-be WWII epic that's deficient on every level.
OED quotes glauer in this sense from The Wars of Alexander, a poem perhaps composed in Lancashire, and surviving in manuscripts by Northern scribes (one from Durham or near it).(9) Glaverande in Morte Arthure 2538 ('Siche glaverande gomes greves me bott lyttill'), defined by OED as 'deceitful, flattering', has also been understood as 'chattering'.(10) On etymology, OED compares glaver 'chatter' with Scottish and Northern claver 'idle talk' and claver 'to prate', first recorded in the seventeenth century, and used by Ramsay, Burns, Scott, and Carlyle.