claudication


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claudication

 [klaw″dĭ-ka´shun]
limping or lameness.
intermittent claudication see intermittent claudication.
jaw claudication a complex of symptoms like those of intermittent claudication but seen in the muscles of mastication, occurring in giant cell arteritis.
venous claudication intermittent claudication caused by venous stasis.

clau·di·ca·tion

(klaw'di-kā'shŭn), This word means 'limping' or 'walking with difficulty'. Avoid nonsense phrases such as jaw claudication and claudication at rest.
Limping, usually referring to intermittent claudication.
[L. claudicatio, fr. claudico, to limp]

claudication

/clau·di·ca·tion/ (klaw″dĭ-ka´shun) limping; lameness.
intermittent claudication  pain, tension, and weakness in the legs on walking, which intensifies to produce lameness and is relieved by rest; it is seen in occlusive arterial disease.
jaw claudication  a complex of symptoms like those of intermittent claudication but seen in the muscles of mastication in giant cell arteritis.
neurogenic claudication  that accompanied by pain and paresthesias in the back, buttocks, and legs that is relieved by stooping, caused by mechanical disturbances due to posture or by ischemia of the cauda equina.
venous claudication  intermittent claudication due to venous stasis.

claudication

(klô′dĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. A halt or lameness in a person's walk; a limp.

claudication

[klô′dikā′shən]
Etymology: L, claudicatio, a limping
cramplike pains in the calves caused by poor circulation of the blood to the leg muscles. The condition is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The disorder is usually manifested after walking and is relieved by rest. Claudication may require arterial bypass grafting, such as femoral popliteal bypass. Claudication must be differentiated from rest pain, a condition that requires surgical intervention and signals limb threat.

claudication

Cardiology Walking-induced pain in one or both legs that does not disappear with continued walking, and is relieved only by rest; claudication is present in 15% to 40% of Pts with peripheral arterial disease and associated with a ↓ ability to perform daily tasks Management Exercise training. See Peripheral arterial disease, Exercise training Orthopedics Limping. See Intermittent claudication, Pseudoclaudication.

clau·di·ca·tion

(klaw'di-kā'shŭn)
Limping, usually referring to intermittent claudication.
[L. claudicatio, fr. claudico, to limp]

claudication

See INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION.

Claudication

Cramping or pain in a leg caused by poor blood circulation. This condition is frequently caused by hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). Intermittent claudication occurs only at certain times, usually after exercise, and is relieved by rest.

claudication

(from claudare, Latin, to limp) limping, with pain, caused by interference with the blood supply to the legs, the result of atheromatous narrowing, blockage or, less often, spasm of an artery. More common in cigarette smokers and diabetics. Known as intermittent claudication when the person experiences severe pain in the legs (calves or thighs) after walking for a time but is able to continue after a short rest. Randomized clinical trials have shown that a graduated exercise programme will increase the distance walked before the symptoms are first felt.

claudication

ischaemic muscular pain (see intermittent claudication)

claudication

limping or lameness.

intermittent claudication
a complex of signs characterized by absence of pain or discomfort in a limb when at rest, the commencement of pain, tension and weakness after walking is begun, intensification of the condition until walking is impossible, and the disappearance of signs after the limb has been at rest. It is seen in occlusive arterial disease of the limbs, e.g. iliac thrombosis.
venous claudication
intermittent claudication caused by venous stasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Achilles tendon, Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse, Intermittent claudication, Doppler ultrasound.
Randomized clinical trial of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, in patients with intermittent claudication.
Intermittent claudication was found in 75% patients and rest pain in 10% patients.
The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Intermittent Claudication and enlists all their major and minor projects
CAD is a rare disease affecting mostly healthy male patients in their 40s and classically causes claudication.
The average patient can increase their walking distance by about 20 percent, and some who do this regimen regularly can actually quadruple their walking distance, as well as walk longer before claudication symptoms kick in.
A tentative diagnosis of neurogenic claudication due to degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with underlying congentially narrowed pedicles was given and a six week (twice per week) treatment program consisting of flexion-distraction and side posture spinal mobilization/ manipulation, neural mobilization of the femoral and sciatic nerves and, flexion based home exercises was started.
Asymptomatic PAD and intermittent claudication are strongly associated with severe cerebrovascular complications and a significant mortality rate.
Your doctor can help you develop an appropriate exercise plan, and may refer you to a claudication exercise rehabilitation program in order to determine the frequency, duration, and level of exercise intensity that is most beneficial for you," says Dr.
CILOSTAZOL (PLETAL): is an antiplatelet drug with vasodilatation properties; it is approved for use in intermittent claudication where there is no pain at rest and no tissue necrosis.
Intermittent claudication (IC) A cramp-like pain in one or both legs that develops from walking and may eventually cause a limp.
Diagnosing intermittent claudication (calf pain) is vital to stop it getting worse.