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classification

 [klas″ī-fĭ-ka´shun]
a systematic arrangement of similar entities on the basis of certain differing characteristics. For names of specific classifications, see under the names.

clas·si·fi·ca·tion

(klas'i-fi-kā'shŭn),
A systematic arrangement into classes or groups based on perceived common characteristics; a means of giving order to a group of disconnected facts.

classification

/clas·si·fi·ca·tion/ (klas″ĭ-fĭ-ka´shun) the systematic arrangement of similar entities on the basis of certain differing characteristics.
adansonian classification  numerical taxonomy.
Angle's classification  a classification of dental malocclusion based on the mesiodistal position of the mandibular dental arch and teeth relative to the maxillary dental arch and teeth; see under malocclusion.
Bergey's classification  a system of classifying bacteria by Gram reaction, metabolism, and morphology.
Caldwell-Moloy classification  classification of female pelves as gynecoid, android, anthropoid, and platypelloid; see under pelvis.
FIGO classification  any of the classification systems established by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics for the staging of gynecological cancers.
Gell and Coombs classification  a classification of immune mechanisms of tissue injury, comprising four types: type I, immediate hypersensitivity reactions, mediated by interaction of IgE antibody and antigen and release of histamine and other mediators; type II, antibody-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, due to antibody-antigen interactions on cell surfaces; type III, immune complex, local or general inflammatory responses due to formation of circulating immune complexes and their deposition in tissues; and type IV cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, initiated by sensitized T lymphocytes either by release of lymphokines or by T-cell–mediated cytotoxicity.
Keith-Wagener-Barker classification  a classification of hypertension and arteriolosclerosis based on retinal changes.
Lancefield classification  the classification of hemolytic streptococci into groups on the basis of serologic action.
New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification  a functional and therapeutic classification for prescription of physical activity for cardiac patients.
Revised European American Lymphoma (REAL) Classification  a classification of lymphomas based on histologic criteria, dividing them into three main categories: B-cell neoplasms, T- or NK-cell neoplasms, and Hodgkin's disease.

classification

(klăs′ə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act, process, or result of classifying.
2. A category or class.
3. Biology The systematic grouping of organisms into categories on the basis of evolutionary or structural relationships between them; taxonomy.

clas′si·fi·ca·to′ri·ly (klăs′ə-fĭ-kə-tôr′ə-lē, klə-sĭf′ĭ-) adv.
clas′si·fi·ca·to′ry (klăs′ə-fĭ-kə-tôr′ē, klə-sĭf′ĭ-, klăs′ə-fĭ-kā′tə-rē) adj.

classification

[klas′ifikā′shən]
Etymology: L, classis, collection, facere, to make
(in research) a process in data analysis in which data are grouped according to previously determined characteristics. classify, v.

classification

Any systematic arrangement of similar entities organisms, disease processes, etc, which are separated based on specific types of differences. See Ambulatory payment classification, Ann Arbor classification, Bethesda classification, Black's classification, BLEED classification, Bormann's classification, Broders' classification, Caldwell-Molloy classification, Cambridge classification, Canadian Cardiovascular Society functional classification, Cladistic classification, Deafness classification, DeBakey classification, Denis classification, Dukes classification, FAB–French-American-British classification, FDA classification of devices, FDA Classification of Teratogenicity, Gustilo classification, Hamilton classification, Hazard classification, Hinchey grading classification, International Classification of Diseases–9th edition, Clinical Modification classification, International Workshop classification for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, ILO classification, Kiel classification, Killip classification, Lovejoy's classification, Ludwig classification, Lukes-Collins classification, Marseille classification, McKusick classification, New York Heart Association classification, Norwood classification, Obesity Task Force classification, Papanicolaou classification, Pesaro classification, Physical status classification, Quebec classification, Rappaport classification, REAL classification, Rosenthal classification, Savary-Miller classification, Shandall classification, TNM classification, Ulcerative colitis classification, Vaughan Williams classification, WHO classification, Wolfe classification, Working Formulation.

clas·si·fi·ca·tion

(klas'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
A systematic arrangement into groups based on perceived common characteristics; a means of giving order to a group of disconnected facts.
[Fr. classe fr. L. classis, class + facere, to make or to do]
Classificationclick for a larger image
Fig. 107 Classification . Universal phylogenetic tree, showing the three domains, which is based on genetic structures and sequences.
Classificationclick for a larger image
Fig. 106 Classification . A comparison of classical and modern classifications.

classification

the ordering of organisms into groups on the basis of their relationships. The groups are referred to as TAXA, for example, kingdom, phylum, division, class, order, family, genus, species. Natural classification based on overall evolutionary (phylogenetic) relationships is the usual form, but artificial classification based on nonevolutionary considerations or on one or a few characters is often used in identification. The CLADISTICS approach has gained favour in some circles.

Classification is not to be confused with ‘identification’ which is the placing of individuals by deductive procedures into previously established groups. Most criteria used in classification have been structural, but as more becomes known of genetical structures and sequences, these are increasingly used as a basis for classification. Several workers have suggested new classifications based on DOMAINS, and that suggested by Woese (1994) is shown in comparison with the widely recognized classical approach (the ‘five kingdom system’) of Whittaker (1969). See fig. 106 . At present the classification of organisms is in a state of flux. In the modern classification of Woese, each domain contains groupings of kingdom-equivalent status so that many other groupings may attain similar status to animals and plants, reflecting the diversity of microorganisms and their evolutionary importance. This can be seen more clearly in the phylogenetic tree in Fig. 107 (after Woese 1994) where the groupings in the domain Bacteria are merely representative of a larger number.

For viruses, classification is normally based on type of nucleic acid, morphology, presence or absence of an envelope and replication properties. A number of families is recognized, with the family name ending in -viridae, e.g. Poxviridae (double-stranded DNA, enveloped animal viruses). The viral genus has the suffix -virus, e.g. Orthopoxvirus, and the viral species is given a common descriptive name ending with virus, e.g. smallpox virus. In general, higher taxa e.g. order, kingdom, have not yet been assigned, but viruses are usually separated into large groups based on host preference e.g. animal viruses, plant viruses and bacterial viruses (see BACTERIOPHAGES).

clas·si·fi·ca·tion

(klas'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
A systematic arrangement into classes or groups based on perceived common characteristics; a means of giving order to a group of disconnected facts.

classification

division of diagnoses, diseases, pathological findings, microbiological findings into categories or classes. See also nomenclature.

virus classification
see Table 8.1.

Patient discussion about classification

Q. How are Heart Murmurs Classified? What are the characteristics of different heart murmurs?

A. Heart murmurs are charachterized by their location, their strength, their timing, whether or not they radiate and so on. For example, this is a sound of a heart murmur compatible with a disease called aortic stenosis-
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/medther/Cardiology/audio/as.wav
Notice that the murmur begin with the heart sound and lasts all through the beat.

More discussions about classification
References in periodicals archive ?
Significantly, the discrepancy between the Census Bureau's official instructions and enumerators' classificatory practice increased markedly from 1910 to 1920.
The discriminant analysis for absolute measurements considering their regional distribution shows that the most discriminant variables were, in order of classificatory power:
As a realist, my account is not hostage to an empirical study of people's classificatory practices.
During the preoperational years, the child makes many different kinds of logico-mathematical relationships, and many systems become "grouped" and differentiated by 7 or 8 years of age--a classificatory system and a seriational system (Inhelder & Piaget, 1959/1964), a system of number (Piaget & Szeminska, 1941/1952), a spatial system (Piaget & Inhelder, 1948/1956; Piaget, Inhelder, & Szeminska 1948/1960), and a temporal system (Piaget, 1946/1969).
Apart from classificatory and comparative concepts, the contemporary philosophy of language also distinguishes so-called "(proto)type concepts.
This occurred, in part, because Foucault, unlike Bourdieu, outlined the workings of the mechanisms by which classificatory systems are translated into social distinctions.
Indeed, they are natural kinds precisely because they lack such definitions and instead have definitions that make possible the right sorts of accommodation between classificatory and inductive practices and relevant causal structures.
A second-order term is simply the square of the attribute variable, and such terms are included to enhance the classificatory performance of the model.
Hottois's briefer consideration of the theme of transcendence in SF (which covers much of the same ground) is much more succinct and to the point, reviewing some of the possibilities (physical versus psychic transcendence, individual and collective), but it is very much an overview, and with Bouchard's classificatory schemes ringing in the background, far too limited.
It has been argued that Tolstoy contuses an evaluative and classificatory sense of 'art'.
In subsequent sections we discuss sample selection issues, present demographic information for our full sample of 382 fraud and nonfraud engagements, discuss the results of univariate and multivariate analyses of the discriminatory power of numerous fraud-risk factors, present our final decision aid, and present an evaluation of the final model's classificatory accuracy.
By choosing to install certain narratives somewhere between history, mystic speech, and poetry, I have enclosed them in an organization, although I know there are places no classificatory procedure can reach, where connections between words and things we thought existed break off.