classical


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classical

/clas·si·cal/ (klas´ĭ-k'l) classic.

classical, classic

the first recognized form of the item; serving as a standard model or guide. See also classical conditioning, east coast fever.

classical conditioning
classical pathway
one of the two pathways of complement activation, initiated by antigen-antibody complexes and involving C1, C2 and C4. It leads to activation of C3 and the terminal pathway. See also alternate complement pathway.
classical swine fever
now the universally accepted name for hog cholera and different from African swine fever (ASF). A highly infectious disease of pigs caused by a pestivirus and characterized in its classical form by high fever, lassitude, purple discoloration of abdominal skin, conjunctivitis and nervous signs including circling, incoordination, tremor and convulsions. Most affected pigs die at 5 to 7 days with a characteristic petechiation under the kidney capsule—turkey egg kidney. There is a second form, characterized by nervous signs and caused by a strain of virus of lower virulence. Other syndromes caused by low virulence strains are reproductive inefficiency and congenital defects including myotonia congenita. Also known as congenital trembles.
References in classic literature ?
We will passical the classical and preserve what joy we have left.
The pear, though cultivated in classical times, appears, from Pliny's description, to have been a fruit of very inferior quality.
The Classical style has well been called sculpturesque, the Romantic picturesque.
A battle sung by the muse in the Homerican style, and which none but the classical reader can taste.
I've been to that classical concert I told you about," said Leonard.
the death that comes from no other hand than one's own, he was desirous of elevating it to the position it held in classical antiquity (see Aphorism
In the meantime original work of a high order was being produced both in England and America by such writers as Bradley, Stout, Bertrand Russell, Baldwin, Urban, Montague, and others, and a new interest in foreign works, German, French and Italian, which had either become classical or were attracting public attention, had developed.
Rawdon Crawley, though the only book which he studied was the Racing Calendar, and though his chief recollections of polite learning were connected with the floggings which he received at Eton in his early youth, had that decent and honest reverence for classical learning which all English gentlemen feel, and was glad to think that his son was to have a provision for life, perhaps, and a certain opportunity of becoming a scholar.
The conversation did not flag for an instant, so that the princess, who always kept in reserve, in case a subject should be lacking, two heavy guns--the relative advantages of classical and of modern education, and universal military service--had not to move out either of them, while Countess Nordston had not a chance of chaffing Levin.
The presence of Lady Wetherby acted as a temporary check on the development of the situation, but after they had been seated at their table a short time the lights of the restaurant were suddenly lowered, a coloured limelight became manifest near the roof, and classical music made itself heard from the fiddles in the orchestra.
Sparsit took a little more tea; and, as she bent her again contracted eyebrows over her steaming cup, rather looked as if her classical countenance were invoking the infernal gods.
His wardrobe was extensive--very extensive-- not strictly classical perhaps, not quite new, nor did it contain any one garment made precisely after the fashion of any age or time, but everything was more or less spangled; and what can be prettier than spangles

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