class II molecule

class II molecule

a major histocompatibility complex membrane-piercing antigen made up of two noncovalently bonded polypeptide chains designated α and β.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

class II mol·e·cule

(klas mol'ĕ-kyūl)
A major histocompatibility complex membrane-piercing antigen made up of two noncovalently bonded polypeptide chains designated α and β.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, the percentage of control cells positive for MHC class II molecule was 1.9%, which was increased to 12.1% by treatment with 27OHChol.
(2003) Cutting edge: the conversion of arginine to citrulline allows for a high-affinity peptide interaction with the rheumatoid arthritis-associated HLA-DRB1*0401 MHC class II molecule. J.
These studies demonstrated that the staphylococcal cell wall components bind to TLR2, which are constitutively expressed on monocyte/macrophages and downregulate their MHC class II molecule expression [22, 24].
The therapy is a highly selective treatment for MS targeting the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule to regulate T-cell activity.
Structures of an MHC class II molecule with covalently bound single peptides.
The number of different antigenic peptides that can be presented by a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class II molecule varies greatly from allele to allele.
The MHC class II molecule plays an important role in this process.
One of the Ii fragments, called 'Ii-Key,' acts on a regulatory site on the MHC class II molecule and controls the association of that molecule with antigenic peptide fragments.
Destruction occurs when the T cell receptor and co-receptor molecules interact with an autoangtigen present in the binding cleft of an MHC class II molecule on the surface of host cell tissue.
Eventually, a bit of the foreign protein may reemerge, this time handcuffed to an MHC class II molecule. The pair acts as a red flag to other white cells, called T cells, which set off an aggressive immune response.
B cells expressing a BCR specific for an allo-HLA can capture, internalize, and process the whole allo-HLA class II molecule and then present allo-HLA-derived peptides on the cell surface.
Ababou and coworkers (Ababou et al., 1994; Ababou et al., 1995) reported evidence for the expression of a third class II molecule that is cross-reactive with HLA-DP.