class II molecule

class II molecule

a major histocompatibility complex membrane-piercing antigen made up of two noncovalently bonded polypeptide chains designated α and β.

class II mol·e·cule

(klas mol'ĕ-kyūl)
A major histocompatibility complex membrane-piercing antigen made up of two noncovalently bonded polypeptide chains designated α and β.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activation of T cells requires the recognition via their T-cell receptors of linear peptide antigens presented in the context of a cell-surface human leukoctye antigen (HLA) class II molecule.
The CD79BxDR SCORPION can bind to two different targets: CD79B, a lineage-restricted component of the B-cell antigen receptor, and HLA-DR, an HLA Class II molecule.
Eventually, a bit of the foreign protein may reemerge, this time handcuffed to an MHC class II molecule.
In particular, he showed that a portion of an MHC class II cofactor controlled antigenic peptide loading onto the class II molecule.
The number of different antigenic peptides that can be presented by a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class II molecule varies greatly from allele to allele.
The MHC class II molecule plays an important role in this process.
One of the Ii fragments, called 'Ii-Key,' acts on a regulatory site on the MHC class II molecule and controls the association of that molecule with antigenic peptide fragments.
Destruction occurs when the T cell receptor and co-receptor molecules interact with an autoangtigen present in the binding cleft of an MHC class II molecule on the surface of host cell tissue.
This allows the Ii-key/epitope 'hybrid' to bypass all the normal MHC class II antigen processing controls and exploit any MHC class II molecule that it comes in contact with, forcing it to present the therapeutic antigenic epitope.
This antibody binds to certain cell surface receptors, the so-called MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class II molecules, killing activated, proliferating MHC class II positive tumor cells, including B-cell- and T-cell-lymphomas and others.
Its extracellular domain binds to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, which can reinforce the T cell receptor (TCR) to recognize the peptide-MHC class II complexes (Doyle et al.