class II device

A ‘medium risk’ medical device—e.g., hearing aids, syringes—approved by the FDA for use in humans
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

class II device

Regulatory affairs A 'medium risk' medical device–eg, hearing aids, syringes, approved by the FDA for use in humans. See 510(K. ).
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(19,21) Mesh was a Class II device for sacrocolpopexy or midurethral sling and, similarly, the transvaginal kit was also a Class II device.
It should be noted that the watch received FDA "clearance" as a Class II device, which is different from FDA "approval," which is typically reserved for Class III devices.
The feature is increasingly becoming a standard for a lot of manufacturers and FDA's clearance for the feature in a Class II device is not for the actual efficacy of the device, but only that it is safe to use.
FDA stresses that an exemption from premarket notification requirements for a Class II device does not make the device exempt from any other statutory or regulatory requirements (unless such exemption is explicitly provided by order or regulation).
The BodiMetrics Pro Health Monitor (an FDA Class II device) and the BodiMetrics Performance Monitor capture ECG, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, blood oxygenation, temperature and other vital health metrics.
The New Regulations removes record-filing for Class I device distributors and requires Class II device distributors to file records with the provincial CFDA.
Categorized as a Class II device for patient monitoring, the PhysIQ PPA software is the first FDA-cleared device to receive the new product code PLB: Automated calculation of a summary index based on several individual measured vital sign inputs.
The typical pathway to market for a Class III device is the Premarket Application (PMA), while the typical pathway to market for a Class II device is the Premarket Notification, or 510(k).
In 2011, the FDA backtracked on its decision and decided to classify the application as a Class II device. By then, the device had already been on the market for several years in India, Australia, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom.
A new Class II device will also be cleared if the manufacturer can show that it is "substantially equivalent" to a device that is already on the market.