cladistics


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cladistics

(klə-dĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
A system of classification based on the presumed phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of groups of organisms.

cla·dis′tic, cla·dis′ti·cal adj.
cla·dis′ti·cal·ly adv.

cladistics

an approach to CLASSIFICATION by which organisms are ordered and ranked entirely on a basis which reflects recent origin from a common ancestor, i.e. like a family tree. The system is concerned simply with the branching of the tree and not with the degree of difference. The latter is the concern of evolutionary taxonomists who oppose the cladistic approach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cladistics works most effectively when either absence-presence and/or other qualitative characters are used (e.
Scotland, 1997, "Primary Homology Assessment, Characters and Character States", Cladistics, vol.
A cladistic analysis and description of seven new species from Mexico and the western United States.
2004) have proved that a typological approach may not only be compatible with a cladistic treatment of characters, but also a necessary first step towards constructing hypotheses on primary homology (De Pinna, 1991) which may be suitable for testing through cladistic analysis (Rua, 1999).
Rather than force data into a phylogenetic tree, splits networks explore and visualise the different signals in a data set, while cladistics will select the most parsimonious tree.
2003 "On the relationship betwen content, ancestor, and ancestry in phylogenetic nomenclature", Cladistics, No.
In lay terms, for the basic premise of cladistics to work you need to be comparing apples with apples.
1988]: 'Cladistic Tests of Adaptational Hypotheses', Cladistics, 4, pp.
Moreover, as nonexperts in the subject they summarize, they give the impression of being perhaps overly impressed with such methodological innovations as cladistics and its imputed power to determine what pre-World War II paleoanthropologists called the "Missing link," which Maryanski and Turner denote as the last common ancestor among humans and other great apes.
Biogeographic Areas and Transition Zones of Latin America and the Caribbean Islands based on panbiogeographic and cladistics analyses of the entomofauna.
Other books focus on genomics, cladistics, or refuting creationist claims.