civil commitment


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civil commitment

Involuntary hospitalization, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
We conclude that the circuit court's error was harmless because it was unrelated to the guilt phase of the NGI defense, and instead, the inaccurate information pertained to the potential civil commitment at the responsibility phase.
He was committed temporarily to a psychiatric facility pending a civil commitment hearing, to be held pursuant to G.L.c.
are obvious disincentives, such as civil commitment and forced
Civil commitment (15) in the United States evolved over time due to
Many families in Massachusetts consider civil commitment a lifeline.
The reason these concerns have materialized is because sexual civil commitment laws vary from other civil commitment statutes.
The queerness of civil commitment isn't news to the people close to the issue.
In Massachusetts, where fatal overdoses dropped for the first time in seven years in 2017, state public health officials don't credit increased use of civil commitment, but rather better training for medical professionals, tighter regulations on painkillers, more treatment beds, wider distribution of the overdose reversal drug naloxone, and other initiatives.
Under the Adam Walsh Child Protection & Safety Act, Appellant William Carl Welshs civil commitment which was based on his confinement for a prior offense was not voided by vacatur of his sentence for that prior offense, the court of appeals held.
Within the United States, 20 states plus the federal government rely on medico-legal collaboration to address the need for confinement and treatment of dangerous sex offenders through indefinite civil commitment. More specifically, legal representatives create the criteria by which offenders are civilly committed as well as discharged from such commitment, and medical experts provide the diagnoses to support these criteria and measure the risk of each offender reoffending.
Background: The Minnesota Sex Offender Program (MSOP) was created in 1994 pursuant to the Minnesota Civil Commitment and Treatment Act: Sexually Dangerous Persons and Sexual Psychopathic Personalities (MCTA).