citation

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citation

Informatics The record of an article, book, or other report in a bibliographic database that includes summary descriptive information–eg, authors, title, abstract, source and indexing terms. See Report.
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(75) For a fuller discussion of the citational politics discussed in the next few paragraphs, see Michael Bacchus, Eating Eve's Plums: On Citation and Hero-Worship, in QUEER FRONTIERS: MILLENNIAL GEOGRAPHIES, GENDERS, AND GENERATIONS 278 (Joseph Boone et al.
The "post-Christian" feminist abandons the citational chain of invoking Jesus' name, invocation of which, at least minimally, identifies one as "Christian"; she hops the tracks and runs on a new course.
In a populist culture like the American one, where hatred and fear of intellectuals has typically taken the form of ignoring them or turning their work into jokes, the construction of the theory queen-for-a-day through excessive citational practices of her and her sexy topics seems merely a new wrinkle on old cloth.
Impact of source and authors on "auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory" - A citational analysis.
Desire was probably always citational. Certainly the Elizabethan poets knew this when they translated, cited, adapted, and reformulated Petrarch, not to mention Theocritus, Ovid, and Catullus.
For example, in Chapter Seven she argues that Robert Louis Stevenson employs a "citational effect" in Treasure Island, which reframes his blatant piracy of others' fictional works as theatrical cliches that are subject to free trade (186).
Tellingly, when Hamann publishes his first two replies to Kant, he titles them specifically as Zugabe zweener Liebesbriefe." That is to say, in contrast to Kant's citational practice, Hamann invites the reader to consult Horace's erotically driven poem.
Citational repetition offers new types of legibility and knowledge of the future.
In any case, he argues for an intertextual-sexual winking of sorts going on between the twelfth line of Shakespeare's sonnet, "Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by," and a motto inscribed in a 1585 putative portrait of Marlowe, "Quod me nurit me destruit." Stanivukovic makes a good argument, but the real strength here remains his citational reading of the portrait itself.
This means that we may see word-for-word citation as a new mode of a venerable citational tradition that originally did not require such heavy-handed reference.
At the same time, the pleasure offered by the romantic duet, its extra-cinematic reach, and the citational relation of these sequences to each other ensure that the vision of conjugality offered by the song survives the narrative conclusion.
Boomer is so saturated by print and so shaped by his studies that "the worlds the whole world he saw, came before many years to seem printed, too" (178), as though his very perceptions were fundamentally citational. A sandpiper on the shoreline looks "to his strained eyesight like a point of punctuation against the 'rounded, rolling waves.' It left fine prints with its feet" (178).