citation bias

citation bias

(sī-tā′shŭn bī′ĭs)
1. The tendency for research investigations that show benefit to be quoted more often than those that are neutral or negative.
2. The tendency for a scientist to cite research articles more frequently that are published in her or his preferred journals (i.e., in those journals that are familiar because they are published in the same country or the same language as that spoken by the scientist).

citation bias

A statistical anomaly based on the known fact that in papers on new treatments the references included are more likely to be those reporting results that support the new treatment than those that do not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Going one step further, to the network of scientific information, scientific citation bias (39) is well documented, favoring the citation of studies with "positive" and the most favorable results and avoiding citations of studies with "negative" results.
Citation bias of hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials.
The impact citation measure includes only articles published during the past eight years, eliminating any citation bias in favor of long-published journals.