circumstantiality


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circumstantiality

 [ser″kum-stan″she-al´ĭ-te]
a disturbed pattern of speech or writing characterized by delay in getting to the point because of the interpolation of unnecessary details and irrelevant remarks; seen in persons with schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorders. See also tangentiality.

cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty

(ser'kŭm-stan'shē-al'i-tē),
A disturbance in the thought process, either voluntary or involuntary, in which one gives an excessive amount of detail (circumstances) that is often tangential, elaborate, and irrelevant, to avoid making a direct statement or answer to a question; observed in schizophrenia and in obsessional disorders. Compare: tangentiality.
[L. circum-sto, pr. p. -stans, to stand around]

circumstantiality

/cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty/ (serk″um-stan″she-al´it-e) a disturbed pattern of speech or writing characterized by delay in getting to the point because of the interpolation of unnecessary details and irrelevant parenthetical remarks.

circumstantiality

[-stan′shē·al′itē]
Etymology: L, circum + stare, to stand
(in psychiatry) a speech pattern in which a patient has difficulty in separating relevant from irrelevant information while describing an event. The patient often includes all details and presents them in a sequential order, with the result that the main thread of thought becomes lost as one association leads to another. Frequently the person may need to have questions repeated because the main point of answers has become lost in the confusion of unnecessary detail. Compare flight of ideas.

cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty

(sĭr'kŭm-stan-shē-al'i-tē)
A disturbance in the thought process in which one gives an excessive amount of detail that is often tangential, elaborate, and irrelevant, to avoid making a direct statement or answer to a question; observed in schizophrenia and in obsessional disorders.
Compare: tangentiality
[L. circum-sto, pr. p. -stans, to stand around]
References in periodicals archive ?
Curiosity is named at least seven times in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688), a narrative that encapsulates in its transatlantic plot the movement not only from Old World to New but also from old-style romance idealization (the aristocratic love-versus-duty world of Coramantien) to the new-style "realism" (the "gashly" circumstantiality of the novel-world of Surinam).
Like the women, Gus and Ben in The Dumb Waiter live in fastidious circumstantiality while musing about the absent, the forces beyond their ken.
Thus to be daunted by so much circumstantiality may simply be a proof that one is reading a book of solid merit.
Clear, goal-directed thinking becomes increasingly difficult, as shown in a diffuseness or "woolliness" and circumstantiality of speech.
In the character of the oppressively orthodox Rector Kroll, Ibsen is recycling familiar material, and the political maneuverings that are central to the plot have been so pruned of circumstantiality that the effect is rather of hollowness than universality.
This is where the circumstantiality of her commitments matters most.
Marlowe's Barabas, who admitted that he had committed adultery, but that was in another country, and besides the wench was dead, was speaking the language of circumstantiality common to scores of minor defendants from the reformation courts of England, Wales, and Scotland.
Circumstantiality, perfectionism, and ambivalence, prominent characteristics of OCPD, make the initial stages of therapy difficult and challenging.
The lateral trip, which Defoe describes with his usual circumstantiality in Captain Singleton, was first undertaken by two Portuguese-speaking black explorers round about 1815.
Whether the results are fruitful or inconclusive, Watson's analysis often tends toward tedious circumstantiality, following as it does the step by step processes of the author's research, a frequent flaw of published dissertations.
from the approved editor of Poe and presented with much circumstantiality, had the effect of silencing for a time most of Poe's defenders and apologists" (p.