circumstantiality

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circumstantiality

 [ser″kum-stan″she-al´ĭ-te]
a disturbed pattern of speech or writing characterized by delay in getting to the point because of the interpolation of unnecessary details and irrelevant remarks; seen in persons with schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorders. See also tangentiality.

cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty

(ser'kŭm-stan'shē-al'i-tē),
A disturbance in the thought process, either voluntary or involuntary, in which one gives an excessive amount of detail (circumstances) that is often tangential, elaborate, and irrelevant, to avoid making a direct statement or answer to a question; observed in schizophrenia and in obsessional disorders. Compare: tangentiality.
[L. circum-sto, pr. p. -stans, to stand around]

circumstantiality

/cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty/ (serk″um-stan″she-al´it-e) a disturbed pattern of speech or writing characterized by delay in getting to the point because of the interpolation of unnecessary details and irrelevant parenthetical remarks.

circumstantiality

[-stan′shē·al′itē]
Etymology: L, circum + stare, to stand
(in psychiatry) a speech pattern in which a patient has difficulty in separating relevant from irrelevant information while describing an event. The patient often includes all details and presents them in a sequential order, with the result that the main thread of thought becomes lost as one association leads to another. Frequently the person may need to have questions repeated because the main point of answers has become lost in the confusion of unnecessary detail. Compare flight of ideas.

cir·cum·stan·ti·al·i·ty

(sĭr'kŭm-stan-shē-al'i-tē)
A disturbance in the thought process in which one gives an excessive amount of detail that is often tangential, elaborate, and irrelevant, to avoid making a direct statement or answer to a question; observed in schizophrenia and in obsessional disorders.
Compare: tangentiality
[L. circum-sto, pr. p. -stans, to stand around]
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if admitted, however, the circumstantial evidence standing alone will not reach the quantum of proof required to overcome the constitutional presumption of innocence,' it added.
The second chapter argues that Shakespeare departs from the more typical circumstantial iterations of his contemporaries by engaging a verbal shaping of action: in Lucrece, as "Opportunity" enables Tarquin's rape explicitly, and later in King Lear, as "Opportunity" operates alongside foresight to "make inhuman atrocity banal and ordinary" (75).
We can finally make an inference only if we get intricate details and circumstantial evidence," the source said.
Finding no fault with the trial court judgment, senior advocates opine that circumstantial evidence is as good as any other and one circumstance can be clinching in a criminal case -- enough to nail a person.
Judge Clarke said: "My conclusion was that circumstantial evidence was not properly admissible in this case.
As prosecutors often state in closing arguments, while people may not always be telling the truth, the circumstantial evidence does not lie.
The self-proclaimed goal of this monograph is "to bring into focus circumstantial clause combining in Arabic and Hebrew by presenting corpus-based pilot studies on circumstantial qualifiers in a choice of language varieties: pre-classical and classical Arabic, classical Hebrew, modern literary Arabic and Gulf Arabic dialects" (p.
Prosecution lawyer Tessa Kitson said the case involved circumstantial evidence, but one in which Crilly confessed to BBC journalists on camera to his involvement which he said he regretted.
The first paper compares occurrences of circumstantial clause combinations in classical varieties of Arabic and Hebrew.
OLD and new evidence was not considered at the original trial of Abdel Baset Ali Al-Megrahi, so he was tried on circumstantial evidence.
As Sherlock Holmes once pointed out, evidence is often dismissed for being circumstantial - but that can be the most damning kind.
Empirical research indicates that jurors routinely undervalue circumstantial evidence (DNA, fingerprints, and the like) and overvalue direct evidence (eyewitness identifications and confessions) when making verdict choices, even though false-conviction statistics indicate that the former is normally more probative and more reliable than the latter.