circumlocution

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circumlocution

[-lōko̅o̅′shən]
the subconscious or learned use of pantomime, nonverbal communication, or word substitution by a patient because a word is difficult to retrieve or has been forgotten. See also anomia.

cir·cum·lo·cu·tion

(sĭr'kŭm-lō-kyū'shŭn)
Indirect, roundabout, wordy, or evasive speech, noted in Alzheimer disease and other dementias.
References in periodicals archive ?
25) The shift to more reflexive and circumlocutory forms of regulation can be highly attractive, considering the challenges and continuous failures of the conventional regulatory approaches.
This nonlinear novel takes its structure from the circumlocutory ramblings of an old man; sometimes Ames is recalling the family's arduous migration from Maine to Kansas to Iowa; sometimes he is worrying about next Sunday's sermon; sometimes he is mourning his first wife and daughter; sometimes he revels in the joys of his present domestic fortune.
Saca also used the call to make a circumlocutory inference that the threats were of FMLN origin.
Being in the government employ," he clarified, "you may not have heard, what every body else has, that the circumlocutory operation of their accounts" was "a great bore" to everyday tradesmen.
39) This principle is based on a circumlocutory passage in Beloff v Pressdram Ltd [1973] 1 All ER 241,262 (Ungoed-Thomas J), quoted in its entirety by Conti J in The Panel Trial (2001) 108 FCR 235, 277.
Yet in this circumlocutory manner, Dowell also intends both to reflect upon his memories of life with Florence and the Ashburnhams, as well as to contextualize their betrayal of him.
The change in language affected Congress and, on its face, had nothing to do with the executive, but if it did, the route to a substantive conception of executive power could not have been more circumlocutory by design.
In the aftermath of new histo ricism, this is hardly innovative; one feature worth mentioning about this book, however, is the circumlocutory manner in which Walker marshalls his proof.
There is also the question of why Martial refers to Verona in such a circumlocutory way.
First, the circumlocutory talk of his characters, the repetitious nature of their stories, and the discrepancies in their renditions reminded me, newly transplanted from India, of the numerous aunts and uncles I'd left behind, their continual gossip about one another and their incessant interference in each other's lives.
As the Director of the FSS puts it, with a spicing of circumlocutory managerialism-speak,
At a time when polite magazines were overflowing with Latinate, polysyllabic, circumlocutory mush, Muir wrote a lean, direct prose, bristling with the energy of hard, Anglo-Saxon words and occasional striking neologisms.