circulatory overload


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Related to circulatory overload: air embolism

hy·per·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-vol-ē'mē-ă)
Abnormally increased volume of blood.
Synonym(s): circulatory overload, plethora (1) , repletion (1) , hypervolaemia.
[hyper- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

overload

(o'ver-lod?)
To exceed the capacity of a cell, physiological process, organism, or system, causing it to fail. overload

circulatory overload

Volume overload.

fluid overload

Volume overload.

iron overload

Organ failure caused by excessive accumulation of iron in the body, usually from frequent transfusions or hemochromatosis.

pressure overload

Demand placed on muscle, esp. heart muscle, in response to high blood pressure or stenotic valves. Over time pressure overload results in cardiac hypertrophy and, eventually, heart failure.

sensory overload

A condition in which sensory stimuli are received at an excessive rate or intensity. Sensory overload can produce increases in heart rate, breathing, blood pressure, confusion, anxiety, mental distress, and/or erratic behavior.

stress overload

Excessive amounts and types of demands that require action.

volume overload

An excess of blood or body fluids in the circulation or extracellular tissues. It is usually caused by transfusions or excessive fluid infusions that increase the venous pressure, esp. in patients with heart disease, and it can result in heart failure, pulmonary edema, and cyanosis.
Synonym: circulatory overload; fluid overload; hypervolemia

hy·per·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-vol-ē'mē-ă)
Abnormally increased volume of blood.
Synonym(s): circulatory overload, plethora (1) , repletion (1) , hypervolaemia.
[hyper- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
The most obvious treatment is restoration of red cell volume by transfusions of fresh blood, but this carries with it such risks as serum hepatitis, transfusion reactions, antibody formation, and circulatory overload. Prevention of blood loss during dialysis or systemically, adequate nutrition, and prevention of red cell damage from dialysis equipment are all vital factors in diminishing anemia.
Besides financial burden many studies have also reported several medical complications associated with blood transfusions.1,12 Increase in postoperative complications like hemolytic and allergic reactions, transfusion- associated acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, graft-verse-host disease and infection as well as mortality due to blood transfusions in either orthopaedic or other fields of surgery are reported in numerous studies.1-8
The chance of someone suffering a TACO (transfusion-associated circulatory overload) when transfused is
The leading causes of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality are unrelated to viral transmission and include bacterial contamination of platelets, patient misidentification, transfusion-related acute lung injury or TRALI, and transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Analogous to chemotherapy, blood transfusions can improve outcomes but only when used in the right patient for the right indication and in the right dose.
The study, published online in Transfusion, also reports rates of transfusion-associated circulatory overload also were reduced by 49%.

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