cinnamon

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cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mon),
1. The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii Nees (family Lauraceae), an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic. Synonym(s): Saigon cinnamon
2. The dried inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum zeylanicum. Synonym(s): Ceylon cinnamon, Sri Lanka cinnamon
Synonym(s): cassia bark
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon

[sin′əmən]
Etymology: Gk, kinnamomon
the aromatic inner bark of several species of Cinnamomum, a tree native to the East Indies and China. Saigon cinnamon is commonly used as a carminative, an aromatic stimulant, and a spice. cinnamic, adj.

cinnamon

Herbal medicine
A tree native to the Indian subcontinent, the bark of which contains cinnamanic aldehyde, eugenol and tannins; it is antibacterial, carminative, stimulates the appetite and is used for gastrointestinal complaints.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii, an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon,

n Latin name:
Cinnamomum spp.; parts used: bark, leaves; uses: antifungal, aromatic, analgesic, diarrhea, colds, stomach pain, appetite loss, hypertension, bronchitis, internal bleeding; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause elevated heartbeat, stomatitis, glossitis, gingivitis, anorexia, labored breathing. Also called
Cassia, Cassia lignea, ceylon cinnamon, Chinese cinnamon, cinnamomom, false cinnamon, Panang cinnamon, Padang cassia, Saigon cassia, or
Saigon cinnamon.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
Dried aromatic bark of Cinnamomum loureirii used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon

a herbal preparation obtained from the bark of Cinnamomum spp. It is used as an astringent in the treatment of diarrhea and flatulence. Cinnamon oil, sometimes used as a name for Cassia Oil, has similar activity, but contains cinnamaldehyde, which has been associated with hypersensitivity reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cinnamon also improved study participants' blood-cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations, Anderson's team reported in the December 2003 Diabetes Care.
Cloves, bay leaves, and other spices show enzymatic effects similar to those of cinnamon, Anderson has found, though none approaches cinnamon's potency.
Use cinnamon sticks to infuse liquids, such as milk for puddings and sauces.
A sprinkling of cinnamon makes oatmeal more palatable to people of all ages, and who doesn't enjoy the intoxicating scent of cinnamon rolls just out of the oven?
Cinnamon pairs well with vegetable and meat dishes, such as the beef brisket recipe at right.
Many cooks prefer Vietnamese cinnamon, but we suggest buying small quantities of various types of cinnamon until you pinpoint your favorite.
Scheduled for completion this October, phase one of Cinnamon Shore consists of 82 individual parcels designated for single-family homes.
Beginning on December 1st, the Santa Ana facility began daily direct production of the 4-Pack Cinnamon Rolls.