cinnamon

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cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mon),
1. The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii Nees (family Lauraceae), an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic. Synonym(s): Saigon cinnamon
2. The dried inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum zeylanicum. Synonym(s): Ceylon cinnamon, Sri Lanka cinnamon
Synonym(s): cassia bark
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon

Herbal medicine
A tree native to the Indian subcontinent, the bark of which contains cinnamanic aldehyde, eugenol and tannins; it is antibacterial, carminative, stimulates the appetite and is used for gastrointestinal complaints.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii, an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
Dried aromatic bark of Cinnamomum loureirii used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequently, the scientists found that cinnamons active ingredients are polyphenol polymers with insulinlike action.
Subsequent test-tube studies showed that cinnamon in the pie was boosting insulin activity, as chromium does, and thus controlling blood glucose.
The researchers gave the participants capsules containing either cinnamon or wheat four.
If you think you've had cinnamon before, there's a good chance you're mistaken.
True Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum), sometimes called "Sri Lankan cinnamon," is the inner layer of bark of a tropical evergreen tree related to bay laurel.
The cassia tree, its relative, produces bark similar to cinnamon. Several varieties are harvested for consumption, and you'll find a host of names for all of these types of cassia.