kinematograph

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kinematograph

(kĭn″ĕ-māt′o-grăf)
A device for viewing photographs of objects in motion; used in studying the motion of organs such as the heart and lungs, and the gastrointestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars of Indian cinema have puzzled over this informal prohibition of the kiss--informal because there is no line item forbidding the kiss in censorship norms deriving from the Cinematograph Act of 1928-29 or its subsequent iteration in 1952.
11) From the appendix of a report compiling 'Price of seats and provision made for Africans in cinemas in Dar es Salaam and Nairobi, 1930', in Tanzania National Archives (hereafter TNA), 'Scheme for establishment of cinematograph theatres in native areas', Secretariat File No.
The Notebooks of Serafino Gubbio, Cinematograph Operator, buttressed by insightful and concise commentary, and featuring a translation of one of Pirandello's most trenchant essays on film, the University of Chicago Press has made an important contribution to scholarship.
Her case was taken up by the Broadcasting Entertainment Cinematograph and Theatre Union, who engaged specialist lawyers Thompsons.
Union Information and Broadcasting minister Priyaranjan Dasmunsi said, "The Indian film industry must become a unified force to market films overseas and overhaul the archaic 1952 Cinematograph Act, and give a boost to digitalization.
Among their topics are the cinematograph in provincial Ireland 1896-1906, American dreams and Irish myths in The Secret of Roan Inish, the films of Andrei Tarkovsky, and designing asynchronous sound for film.
That scene was banned because it contravened the Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act of 1937, but there are plenty of other, equally revolting, moments.
But the biggest and most obvious limitation of all, of course, is that there is no film footage before 1895 and the arrival of the cinematograph.
That article relating to Cinematograph Films permits screen quotas to require the exhibition of domestically-made films for a specified minimum proportion of total screen time.
Hurley was a dedicated artist who would do anything for the perfect image, including hefting his plate camera to the top of Mount Duse, South Georgia, and balancing with his cinematograph high in the rigging of Endurance.
Those spectators to the Lumieres' cinematograph were thrilled at a baby having breakfast and terrified at the sight of a train headed toward the audience as it entered the station.