kinematograph

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kinematograph

(kĭn″ĕ-māt′o-grăf)
A device for viewing photographs of objects in motion; used in studying the motion of organs such as the heart and lungs, and the gastrointestinal tract.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In Kuala Lumpur, the Selangor Band supplied musical accompaniment to the Grand Parisian Cinematograph and London Chronograph, and a string band accompanied the French Cinematograph on Saturdays.
Contemporaneously, the 'Central Board for Film Certification was formed by the Government of India to certify films for public exhibition under The Cinematograph Act, 1952'.
"There's considerable proof that, almost 10 years before the brothers unveiled their cinematograph, Le Prince had a working movie camera and the ability to project the pictures onto a screen," says Doros.
Which two French brothers invented a working cinematograph? 6.
housed on the site of the Lumiere factories, where the cinematograph was invented in 1895.
More technical boys' toys can be found at the Institut Lumiere, housed on the site of the Lumiere factories, where the cinematograph was invented in 1895.
Back then he was known as Motl Mendle, a photographer who, on returning to his shtetl, finds an 1896 Lumiere Brothers cinematograph which his now deceased father had bought.
The term "cinema" (shortened from cinematograph) has come to be applied to the entertainment itself, as well as the houses in which it is exhibited, and has rapidly become the most popular form of indoor amusement everywhere.
The 1909 Cinematograph Act had led to hundreds of new cinemas being built across the country, and cinema audiences had increased enormously as a result.
During his stay, Conrad delivered remarks in May 1923 in a brief address entitled in his notes "Author and Cinematograph." In his remarks in "Author and Cinematograph" Conrad argues that "the aim of the novelist has been [...] to present humanity in action on the background of the changing aspects of nature and a series of acted scenes exhibiting part of life in a connected series up to some appointed conclusion.
Although the character of the programs varied greatly, and objections were sometimes raised, in general the prudence exercised by Scottish exhibitors in their choice of subject allowed their cinematograph shows to reach conservative rural areas without the controversy that surrounded cinema in some urban contexts.