cinchona


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cinchona

 [sin-ko´nah]
the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine, cinchonine, and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă),
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees (family Rubiaceae), native of South America but cultivated in various tropic regions. The cultivated bark contains 7-10% of total alkaloids; about 70% is quinine. Cinchona contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

(sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′-)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes, some species of which are cultivated for their bark, which contains quinine and other alkaloids used chiefly to treat malaria.
2. The dried bark of any of these plants. Also called Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark.

cin·chon′ic (sĭng-kŏn′ĭk, sĭn-chŏn′-) adj.

cinchona

Herbal medicine
A tree native to South America, the primary source of the alkaloids, quinine and quinidine, which was the first effective antimalarial agent; other alkaloids present in cinchona include cinchonidine and cinchonine.
 
Toxicity
Abdominal pain, deafness, delirium, headache, impaired vision, nausea, psychotic disorder, tinnitus, vomiting and weakness.

Homeopathy
See China.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă)
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

A south American tree, genus Cinchona , from the bark of which quinine is derived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cinchona. In: Willcox M, Bodeker G, Rasoanaivo P, editors.
Chapters are: the prehistory of natural rubber; plant introduction of Cinchona by Markham ahead of Hevea; WickhamAEs passion for the tropics and his encounter with rubber; Wickham at Santarem and his tugs of war with Kew Botanic Gardens and the Office of India; odyssey of Hevea from the Amazon to Kew and then to the Orient; Wickham after Hevea; a planter obsessed; Ridley, the father of rubber plantation in Malaya; Ford and Fordlandia: Hevea brasiliensis returned; natural rubber science, and Wickham and Ford; the Society of Transportation networks in the 21st century; the sustainable development of natural rubber.
La Condamine also found time to study the caoutchouc tree, whose resin produced the amazing bouncing balls of the natives, and cinchona, the source of quinine.
Others include penicillin, developed from mold; aspirin, from willow bark; thymol, from thyme; quinine, from the cinchona tree.
The road he takes is lined with orange trees, cinchona plantations and flower nurseries.
What drug is obtained from the bark of the cinchona tree?
Cinchona alkaloid-based osmium complexes are harmless and known to be the most effective chiral catalysts for AD reactions in terms of both reactivity and enantioselectivity [15-18].
"There's a cinchona tree on it." Cinchona is the source of bitterness in quinine, the key flavoring agent in Ionic water, and is native to the tropical Andes forests of western South America.
You'll also discover how a tree called cinchona saved countless lives and how a grass called papyrus made it possible to share information through writing.
Struck by the bitter taste of willow bark, and so likening it to cinchona bark because of the taste, he wondered if it would have similar medicinal actions.