ciliocytophthoria

cil·i·o·cy·toph·thor·i·a

(sil'ē-ō-sī'tōf-thōr'ē-a),
Detached ciliary tufts (remnants of ciliated epithelium) seen in a variety of body fluids, especially peritoneal, amnionic, and respiratory specimens; they are motile and can be confused with ciliated or flagellated protozoa.
[Pl. of ciliocytophthorium, fr. cilio- + cyto- + G. phthora corruption, decay, + -ium, noun suffix]

cil·i·o·cy·toph·thor·i·a

(sil'ē-ō-sī-tof-thōr'ē-ă)
Detached ciliary tufts (remnants of ciliated epithelium) that can be seen in a variety of body fluids, especially peritoneal, amnionic, and respiratory specimens; they are motile and can be confused with ciliated or flagellated protozoa.
[fr. cilio- + cyto- + G. phthora corruption, decay, + -ium, noun suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ciliocytophthoria is a less specific change consisting of detached fragments of superficial bronchial cell cytoplasm with cilia, suggestive of viral infection, but can also be associated with bronchial carcinoma.
An increase in ciliocytophthoria in sputum specimens, a nonspecific finding, has been described in adenoviral infections.
Ciliocytophthoria in sputum from patients with adenovirus infections.
Ciliocytophthoria have been misinterpreted as ciliated Microorganisms.[1-4] Hilding first noted these anucleate, apical remnants of ciliated epithelial cells in 1930.[5] In 1956, Papanicolaou used the term ciliocytophthoria to describe these degenerative cellular fragments.[6] Ciliocytophthoria are now well described by cytologists and cytopathologists and are most often seen in fixed, stained cytologic preparations.[1,3-11] Motile forms have also been observed in flesh nasopharyngeal and peritoneal specimens.[2,4]
We describe both motile and nonmotile ciliocytophthoria in a fresh specimen, which originally raised concerns of a parasitic infection.
The specimen was then examined by parasitologists and pathologists, who determined the forms to represent ciliocytophthoria and not a ciliated protozoan.
Probably the most confusing are ciliocytophthoria, the ciliated, apical anucleate fragments of respiratory epithelial cells.
Infections due to B coli are extremely rare and usually involve the large intestine rather than the respiratory tract.[22] Balantidium coli are the largest single-celled human parasite and measure 50 to 100 x 40 to 70 [micro]m.[22] Ciliocytophthoria are much smaller; in our specimen, they averaged 12 x 10 [micro]m.
Sidaway et al found ciliocytophthoria difficult to detect in air-dried, Diff-Quik-stained smears.[23] We, however, found this rapid stain easy to perform an interpret and useful for the confirmation of ciliocytophthoria on an air-dried aliquot of specimen.
Ciliocytophthoria should be considered when round-to-oval, motile, or nonmotile ciliate forms are identified in clinical specimens from anatomic sites that are lined by ciliated epithelial cells.
Pseudoparasites due to Ciliocytophthoria. Arch Pathol Lab Med.