ciliary movement


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Related to ciliary movement: thymus, Cilia and flagella

cil·i·ar·y move·ment

the rhythmic, sweeping movement of epithelial cell cilia, of ciliate protozoans, or the sculling movement of flagella, effected possibly by the alternate contraction and relaxation of contractile threads (myoids) on one side of the cilium or flagellum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cil·i·ar·y move·ment

(sil'ē-ar-ē mūv'mĕnt)
The rhythmic, sweeping movement of epithelial cell cilia, of ciliate protozoans, or the sculling movement of flagella, possibly resulting from the alternate contraction and relaxation of contractile threads (myoids) on one side of the cilium or flagellum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ciliary movement

The rhythmical beating movement of CILIA on the surface of ciliated EPITHELIUM reminiscent of wind blowing across a field of ripe corn.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ciliary movement

locomotion brought about by the beating of cilia (see CILIUM) as found in some protozoans (ciliates) and free-living flatworms (Turbellaria). Numerous cilia projecting from the body beat in relays giving the effect of waves. This is called METACHRONAL RHYTHM. Cilia are rigid on the back stroke, pushing the organism forward, but bend on the forward stroke.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Concerning the mechanism of flagellar and ciliary movement, the idea that it was accomplished by sliding of the outer doublet microtubules with the aid of the arms had already been suggested when the ultrastructures of flagella and cilia were first revealed.
Ciliary movement may take part in sweeping mucus secretions from the mucus cells that serve to capture foreign particles and remove them from the gills (Nuwayhid et al.
The infrequency of nasal tuberculosis might be explained by the protection afforded by ciliary movement, the bactericidal action of nasal secretions, and the filtering provided by the nasal vibrissae.
Tubulin-dynein system in flagellar and Hideo MOHRI, Kazuo INABA, ciliary movement Sumio ISHIJIMA and Shoji A.