dyskinesia

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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There are Two Types of Screening Tests done for Diagnosis of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. They are as follows
Primary ciliary dyskinesia and associated sensory ciliopathies.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia is usually an autosomal recessive disorder with variable phenotypic expressions.
Kartagener syndrome is part of the larger group of disorders referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesias. Approximately one half of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia have situs inversus and, thus, areclassified as having Kartagener syndrome.
A genetic basis for CRS is supported by familial tendencies as well as the association of CRS with genetic syndromes such as CF and primary ciliary dyskinesia syndrome, as discussed above.
Both children had a pair of rare genetic diseases--Miller syndrome, characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, and primary ciliary dyskinesia, which affects the respiratory tract.
The second is primary ciliary dyskinesia, a lung disorder that raises the risk of respiratory infections because the hairlike extension on cells called cilia fail to move properly.
(1) Between 3% and 5% of patients with situs inversus have primary ciliary dyskinesia. Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive condition.
The guideline advises assessment for factors that could modify management, including allergic rhinitis, cystic fibrosis, immunocompromised state, ciliary dyskinesia, and anatomical variation.
I have learned of primary ciliary dyskinesia and situs inversus, where the abdominal and thoracic organs are in a reversed position, in a young dog in Belgium.
For Sophia the worry was doubled because Alex, 12, was born with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia, a rare genetic condition that means he is prone to chest infections.