chyle


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chyle

 [kīl]
the milky fluid taken up by the lacteals from the intestine during digestion, consisting of lymph and triglyceride fat (chylomicrons) in a stable emulsion, and conveyed by the thoracic duct to empty into the venous system.

chyle

(kīl), Do not confuse this word with chyme.
A turbid white or pale yellow fluid taken up by the lacteals from the intestine during digestion and carried by the lymphatic system through the thoracic duct into the circulation. Its milky appearance is due to chylomicrons in the lymph.
[G. chylos, juice]

chyle

(kīl)
n.
A milky fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fat extracted from chyme by the lacteals during digestion and passed to the bloodstream through the thoracic duct.

chy·la′ceous (kī-lā′shəs), chy′lous (kī′ləs) adj.

chyle

(kīl)
A turbid white or pale yellow fluid taken up by the lacteals from the intestine during digestion and carried by the lymphatic system through the thoracic duct into the circulation.
[G. chylos, juice]

chyle

A milky alkaline fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fat that is absorbed into fine ducts called lacteals in the lining of the intestine after a fatty meal. Chyle is carried by lymph vessels into the bloodstream.

chyle

the form of food after passage through the mammalian SMALL INTESTINE, forming an alkaline, fluid emulsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The positive effect of these diets and TPN is some reduction in chyle flow, and this may help seal the leak.
The composition of chyle is key in determining appropriate patient management of a persistent effusion (see Table 2).
A 50 ml syringe was used to manually aspirate the chyle from E.T's pleural space and slowly reinfuse it back into his circulatory system by way of the extracorporeal circuit.
Although pure chyle is white and opaque in appearance, it has been reported that 50% of chylous effusions do not have a milky/cloudy appearance upon gross examination, (4).
Some measure of that complexity to be taken up in this essay could be put this way: Whitman's seemingly simple rejection of Emerson's metaphorical, bloodless "chyle" turns out to be no mere metaphor at all, but a crucial metonymy that Whitman learns from Emerson.
(11 12) The incidence of chyle leaks following neck dissection has been estimated to range from 1 to 5.8%.
His ideas about the formation of chyle were vague, although he found components in it reminiscent of blood, including "white globules" and a coagulable fluid (15).
Although the incidence of chyle fistula post surgery is low (1%-4%), this complication can present significant challenges including fuid and electrolyte abnormalities, malnutrition, and overwhelming infections, including peritonitis and empyema (2, 3).
PROSPECTING FOR ACTINOBACTERIOPHAGE PRESENCE IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND NEONATE CHYLE. MITCHELL DISHAROON, MICHAEL SANDEL AND KAYLA FAST, UNIVERSITY OF WEST ALABAMA.
It is our practice to follow a low-fat diet that is regularly advanced over four weeks to minimize the risk of chyle leak.
Postoperative complications were defined as one or more of the following cases occurring postoperatively: postoperative bleeding (anastomosis and abdominal cavity) [18], incision infection [19], anastomotic leak [20], pancreatic fistula [21], duodenal stump fistula [22], chyle leak [23], abdominal infection [19], delayed gastric emptying [24], postoperative ileus [25, 26], postoperative pneumonia [9, 27], cardiovascular complications, liver complications, and urinary complications.